8 Fall Tips for Healthy Living

By Maire,


There’s no need to pack on pounds or fall ill this autumn.

A nip is in the air, as summer eases into the fall season. Football season starts, and so does school. The holidays are right around the corner. So is the flu season. To help keep you healthy over the next few months, we’ve got these tips:

1. Take a Tailgate Time-out

It’s an all-American past-time — the tailgate party! Tailgating today has progressed far beyond burgers and chips. You’ll find everything from cheese dip to spicy chicken wings.

Don’t despair: Your tailgate spread doesn’t have to sideline your weight loss plan. Grilled kabobs are great fare on the field. Just skewer veggies, fruits, and lean meat, and soak in your favorite marinade. Seafood, salsas, wraps, and stews are good eating, too. A Crock-Pot of chili — loaded with high-fiber, high-protein beans — is a classic tailgate dish (don’t forget the Beano).

Just remember, alcohol is packed with calories. Enjoy your favorite brew, but switch it out for zero-calorie beverages as the party rolls along. It’s all in how you play the game!

2. Sleep Tips to Help Kids’ Weight

Does your child get enough sleep? If not, it could affect more than sleepiness at school. Studies suggest there may be a link between skimping on sleep and being healthy and overweight. Sleep shortfalls may increase hunger hormones — so kids eat more. Also, kids are less likely to get exercise (and burn off calories) when they’re tired.

To help kids and teens get a good night’s sleep:

  • Remove TVs, computers, and gadgets from kids’ bedrooms.
  • Avoid large meals before bedtime.
  • Develop a regular bedtime routine.
  • Set firm bedtimes and wake times.
  • Make sure the bedroom is quiet, dark, relaxing — and not too hot or cold.
  • Help kids quiet down a few hours before bedtime.
  • Heavy studying, text messaging, or video games should end in early evening.

How much sleep do schoolkids need? It depends on the child. But here are some general guidelines from the National Sleep Foundation:

  • Ages 3-5: 11-13 hours
  • Ages 5-12: 10-11 hours
  • Ages 11-17: 9.5-9.25 hours

3. Quit Smoking: You Won’t Gain Weight

If you’ve finally decided to kick the habit, there’s good news: Quitting smoking won’t make you gain weight over the long term. Some people pick up 4 or 5 pounds early on, but that’s only temporary.

To quit successfully, experts agree, get help and support from your doctor, family, friends, and co-workers. A doctor or mental health professional can help you tailor an approach that best suits you. There are many FDA-approved medications to help people quit smoking.

Combine medication with other quit strategies — like avoiding your smoking triggers or changing your daily routine — and you greatly increase your odds of quitting for good.

Another tip: Some foods and drinks make cigarettes taste better; some make them taste worse. Try eating more vegetables and less meat — and swap that coffee (or alcohol) for a glass of milk. Let your taste buds stifle those cravings!

4. Flu Vaccine? Who? You.

As temperatures get chillier and people spend more time indoors, flu season sneaks in. Because the flu virus can infect the lungs, it can cause a serious complication like pneumonia — which can require hospitalization, even lead to death. That’s why certain people must get a flu shot.

October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but you can still get vaccinated in December or later. Flu season can start as early as October and last as late as May.

If you live with or care for a child under 2 years old, you are in a priority group for flu shots.

There are two types of flu vaccines: flu shots and nasal sprays. The flu shot vaccine is recommended for:

  • Children aged 6 months to 19 years.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People age 50 and older.
  • People of any age with chronic medical conditions such as asthma.
  • People living in nursing homes or other long-term facilities.

Others who could get Flu Mist nasal spray include healthy people 2-49 years old who are not pregnant.

Also, protect yourself and your child from catching or spreading viruses:

  • Cover nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or cough. Throw it away afterward.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water — especially important after you cough or sneeze on them. Use an alcohol-based hand cleaner if necessary.
  • Keep you and your baby away from people who are coughing or sneezing.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth — since that’s how germs are spread

In 2009, the H1N1 swine flu, a new flu virus, emerged. This virus spreads from person to person like seasonal flu, mainly through coughing or sneezing or sometimes by touching something that became infected with the virus. A vaccine for swine flu is in production.

5. Holiday Game Plan: No Weight Gain

The challenges of holiday feasting are only too obvious — wonderful smells and fabulous tastes. We do love our comfort food! But the traditional holiday weight gain is another matter. If it’s a real problem for you, here’s good news. With a few simple changes, you can enjoy the feast without gaining the extra 1 to 3 pounds that tend to become permanent baggage.

Here’s your plan:

  • Don’t arrive starving. Eat something small and healthy, like oatmeal or a whole-grain sandwich, before the big meal. That will keep you full until dinner.
  • Exercise every day. This means big holidays, too. Get the family out with you. Start a new holiday tradition that involves activity.
  • Establish ground rules with yourself. Eat dessert, but only a sliver, for example.
  • Keep track. Write down everything you eat. If you put it in writing, you’re less tempted to overeat.
  • Eat smaller portions of high-calorie dishes. Enjoy, but don’t pig out.
  • Save calories for the foods you love. Don’t eat something just because it’s there.
  • Chat more, eat less. Shun those high-fat appetizers at holiday parties.
If you know you’ll have trouble resisting those favorite foods, plan for it. Cut back on eating early in the week. Get more exercise before and after the holidays. You can do this!

6. Sweet Potatoes: Winter Superfood

It’s one of the sweetest ways to make a healthful change — get hot about sweet potatoes. These luscious orange tubers boast a wealth ofantioxidants; phytochemicals including beta-carotene; vitamins C and E; folate; calcium; copper; iron; and potassium. The fiber in sweet potatoes promotes a healthy digestive tract, and the antioxidants may play a role in preventing heart disease and cancer.

The natural sweetness of a roasted sweet potato is delicious without any additional fats or flavor enhancers.

Sweet potato winter superfood

7. Exercise Your Brain: Go Dancing

You know your heart benefits from exercise. Your brain does, too. Studies show that regular, moderate exercise — 30 minutes of walking or a light one-mile run — helps fight the effects of aging on the brain. No grueling workouts required!

All types of exercise count, including walking, bicycling, hiking, swimmingaerobics, and weight training. Ballroom dancing is another good and healthy one, especially fun on chilly evenings.

How does exercise work to prevent mental decline? Researchers believe exercise may stimulate the body to fight stress that’s normally occurring in the brain — stress that causes oxidative damage. All that good stuff from a little exercise!

Plus, find your perfect playlist for any activity, workout, party and more on the Fit Radio app!

8. Curl Up With Hot Coffee

That wonderfully warming cup of morning coffee may have healthy benefits. The caffeine in coffee stimulates the brain and nervous system, and may lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, mood problems, headaches, and even cavities.

Scientists have discovered coffee’s many beneficial substances, including chlorogenic acid, a compound in the antioxidant family that may improve glucose (sugar) metabolism. Another perk is that coffee contains magnesium, a mineral that can also improve insulin sensitivity and enhance glucose tolerance — thumbs up for preventing diabetes.

Another plus is that coffee is naturally calorie-free. Just don’t load it up with extra calories from cream, sugar, whipped cream, and/or flavored syrup.

6 Common Beginner Running Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

By Maire,

Girl Runner Rain

How difficult can running be? You just need to put on running shoes, clothes and then hit the road. But this seemingly simple exercise is more complicated than most people realize.

In fact, most beginners make mistakes that hinder them from seeing results or wanting to pursue the sport long-term—they only end up with injuries and frustrations. Today we’ll look into common running mistakes and how you can avoid them.


1. Inconsistency

Most runners begin with a lot of enthusiasm only to lose momentum after a few weeks. But you can’t lose weight or get fitter if you’re not consistent. You’ll always be starting over if you skip workouts for 2 or 3 weeks.

The fix: The most important thing is to have a routine. Write down the days you’ll run, the distance and duration. While it might not be possible to stick to the routine all the time, do your best to complete all the runs within the week.

2. Not doing strength training

Most beginners abandon all exercises and focus on running only. They don’t realize that running can increase risk of injury and weaken some bones and muscles if not combined with other exercises.

The fix: Combine running with strength training. Doing bodyweight exercises regularly will reduce risk of injuries and help increase muscle mass. Do simple exercises like squats, lunges and push ups once or twice a week.

3. Too intense at the start

Most beginners are eager to see results, so they run too fast or run long distances. Running a 5k after a few weeks of training is a mistake. It can lead to injuries or fatigue.

The fix: Don’t train as someone who has been doing this for years, start slow and work on building discipline and consistency. Then increase the pace and distance of your runs gradually.

4. Wearing the wrong shoes

Wearing the wrong shoes doesn’t just cause blisters – it can lead to knee, hip and ankle pain. Avoid wearing old shoes or shoes that aren’t fit for running.

The fix: Go to a running store and buy proper running shoes. You can even ask the salesperson to help you pick the best shoe. Avoid wearing old shoes because they lack proper cushioning and balance.

5. Landing on your heels

Landing on your heels increases risk of injury. This usually happens when runners make long strides.

The fix: You should always land mid-sole when running. Avoid making long strides that will force you to land on your heels.

6. Not drinking enough water

Most runners don’t drink water during runs to avoid side stitches. But this can cause dehydration and low performance.

The fix: Drink at least 2 glass of water an hour before you run and one glass right before you run. Feel free to carry a bottle of water if you’re going for a long run. And of course remember to hydrate after the run.


Which beginner mistake did you make?

Read the full article here.


Runners, don’t forget the importance of music! Fit Radio has found the key to the perfect running mix. Learn more about the new Fit Radio Running Feature here.

6 Mistakes Fitness Trainers See You Making at the Gym

By Maire,

Shot of a beautiful young woman exercising in the cityhttp://

Run smarter, avoid injury, burn more calories, and claim a bigger body payoff with this “aha!” advice from top fitness pros.

Maria Masters


Tips from trainers

Ever wish you could eavesdrop on the personal training session taking place across the weight room and snag some inside “gym-formation”? Then listen up: We asked five top-tier fitness experts what mistakes they see many of us making. It turns out, the adjustments they recommend are surprisingly easy. Adapt these simple improvements for a cranked-up calorie burn (no extra gym hours necessary) and pain-free workout—you’ll see results fast.


Fitness Trainer

You lean on the machine too much

Nope, not figuratively. If you’re literally resting on the handles while you pedal up a dust storm, your lower body isn’t working as hard as it could be—and that means fewer calories torched, says Michele Olson, PhD, professor of exercise physiology at Auburn University in Alabama. Plus, you won’t effectively engage your glutes and core.

Worse, you could be setting yourself up for injury, because the muscles and joints in your shoulders and neck are forced to support much more weight than usual. “When you lean on the machine, you’re transferring about 30% of your body weight to your arms, shoulders, and neck,” says Olson. “If you weigh 145 pounds, that’s nearly 50 pounds.” Touch bike or treadmill rails with your fingertips for balance, and actively pump your arms if you’re on an elliptical.

Fitness Gym Machine Mistakes

You’re breathing all wrong

“Most people’s breaths are too shallow, at rest and during a workout,” says Beth Jordan, a personal trainer and spokesperson for the American Council of Exercise (ACE). Deep breathing recruits more of the oxygen your muscles need to function efficiently while exercising. With shallow breathing, you’ll notice that your chest rises and falls; deep breathing moves your belly. The timing matters, too: Breathe out on the exertion part of the movement. The exhalation helps push, pull, or rotate the body. “People have a tendency to hold their breath at strenuous points,” notes Jordan. “This limits oxygen delivery to the brain and can cause dizziness or a spike in blood pressure.”

On a run? Exhale as your foot strikes the ground, not before. Your diaphragm relaxes when you breathe out, so your core isn’t as stable, says Jordan—and you don’t want to land at your body’s least stable moment. Change up which foot hits the ground as you exhale. Otherwise, “it’s like wearing a heavy backpack all the time on your left shoulder instead of equally across both shoulders,” explains Jordan.

Fitness Tips to Breathing

You shouldn’t “HIIT” it hard every day

HIIT (high-intensity interval training) melts lots of calories in a short amount of time. But like most wondrous things in life (Louboutin heels, ice cream), it’s better in moderation. HIIT requires powerful effort—think 8 or 9 on the exertion scale—leaving your muscles stressed afterward. Do HIIT days back-to-back and your muscles will remain in a broken-down state (and more susceptible to a longer-term injury). “Your muscles repair and strengthen during the hours after the workout,” says Cris Dobrosielski, a spokesperson for ACE. “You should wait about 48 hours before doing another HIIT session.”

HIIT Training

You’re only working your mirror muscles

Don’t neglect muscles like the erectors, which help lengthen the torso, and the rhomboids and external rotators of the shoulder. “Skip these and it’s only a matter of time before you get a back or shoulder injury,” warns Dobrosielski. Do “pulling” moves (like bent-over rows) at least as often as you do “pushing” ones (think chest presses), which target your front.

Also, add back extensions to your routine: Lie face facedown, arms by sides and slightly off the ground, palms up. Raise your trunk a few inches and rotate your palms to face down; pause, then slowly lower. Do two sets of 15 reps.

Fitness Gym Tips

That cardio rut is bad for your body

Spin may be your true love, but you should have mini-affairs with other heart-pounding fitness workouts. “Most of the cardio we do is only forward and backward,” explains Fantigrassi. “When muscles on one side of a joint are strong and the opposing muscles are weak, it can destabilize the join”—and lead to injury.

The fitness fix: Combine cardio workouts that put your body in different plans of motion; for example, jog for 10 minutes, row for 10 minutes, and then do a few minutes of plyometrics, like jump lunges. Mix it up and your joints will thank you.

Gym Cardio

You should baby your hip flexors

Sitting for long hours tightens your hip flexors (the muscles above your thighs that let your legs bend toward your body). The tension is a precursor to posture problems and an achy back, says Mike Fantigrassi, director of professional services at the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

Loosen your hips using this kneeling hip stretch: Kneel on left leg, with right leg bent at 90 degrees in front of you; place right hand on right hip and raise left arm (A). Contract glutes and shift forward, then rotate hips to the left until you feel a stretch in the front of pelvis (B). Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides.

Hip Flexors

There’s a reason why you’re not losing weight

Your boot-camp class won’t change the number on the scale if you’re committing these errors outside of your sweat sessions:

You think about burn only in the gym: “You get strong in the gym—but you get lean in life,” says celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak, who encourages his clients to wear pedometers and log more than 10,000 steps per day.

You aren’t food-focused: A recent study in Current Biology suggests there’s a limit to how many calories we burn through physical activity; after torching more than a moderate amount, our bodies make it hard to let precious energy go. The fix is in the kitchen: “To drop 1 to 2 pounds a week, cut about 2,000 calories weekly through diet and exercise,” says Jordan.

You’re not as active as you think: One study out of York University in Toronto found that even when people were told what “vigorous” exertion should feel like, they still underestimated how much effort a physical activity actually required. A heart-rate monitor can help give you a more realistic idea of your effort and burn.

How to Become a Morning Person and Fit In a Workout

By Maire,


24 Morning Workout Tips That Are Actually Helpful



We know not everyone is a morning person. (And even fewer of us are eager to wake up and hit the gym.) But getting up and moving can actually be an amazing way to start your day.

While the best time to exercise depends on your schedule and your body, the odds are in favor of morning workouts. Think about it: You won’t have to trudge to the gym after a long day of work, you may sleep better, and you’re more likely to actually get it done if you do it before other (sometimes more fun) options come up. (Who wants to say no to happy hour?!)

Sure, you may have heard the usual tips and tricks, but what hacks do people who consistently work out in the early a.m. use? We asked those who know best—a mix of people who train for a living, Greatist staffers, and you, our dear readers—to find out what gets them up and at ‘em at the crack of dawn.

From the Experts

1. Cool down to warm up.

“I ride a Citi Bike to the gym to teach—even in the winter. Those single-digit temperatures and bitter breeze smack me so hard in the face, I don’t even need a cup of coffee!” — Ryan Wilke, co-founder of Throwback Fitness

2. Set two alarms.

“The first one lets me know I have 15 more minutes to sleep, which makes me happy. Then I meditate for 10 minutes, drink an almond milk cappuccino, play music (pretty loud—sorry, neighbors!), and throw on a super-bright Nike outfit. Caffeine. Clear Head. Neon. I’m out the door and ready to take on the day.” — Holly Rilinger, Nike Master Trainer, Flywheel Master Instructor, and co-creator of BeachFIT

3. Pack accordingly and get in bed early.

“Every evening I check to see what the morning workout will be and prepare my bag accordingly (not every day is a jump rope day). On weekdays I’m in bed no later than 10:30 p.m., so my 6:30 a.m. alarm doesn’t feel quite so brutal. I’m ready and out the door within 10 minutes.” — Sandee Shin, CrossFit Virtuosity athlete

4. Flip a switch.

“Blinding light as soon as the alarm goes off always makes me realize I don’t want to go back to sleep. Then I turn on some tunes—on days I need extra help I’ll go for Drake or Nikki—and grab my first cup of coffee rather than the covers.” — Jessi Kneeland, personal trainer and creator of Remodel Fitness

5. Have a delicious breakfast ready and waiting.

“When I’m looking at another 5 a.m. wake up call, I’ll pre-order my favorite smoothie from my go-to smoothie shop to be delivered to the box early the next morning. Once I hit that send button, I know I have get up early—not just so I can eat it, but to make sure nobody else eats it (which, yes, has almost happened). I even label my alarm to say: ‘Get your damn Liquiteria.'” — Sarah Pope, assistant coach at Brick New York

Fit Radio Workout App

6. Keep the alarm away from your bed.

“In fact, I used to have an alarm clock that would purposely vibrate off my nightstand, then shake and roll all over the floor so I had to chase it to shut it off! For me, the hardest part is that initial physical act of getting my body out of bed. It’s all downhill from there!” —Brian Gallagher, co-founder of Throwback Fitness

7. Make it a habit.

“Life is about habits, both big and small. So to get to the bigger goal of working out in the morning, I stick to small habits along the way, like placing my alarm clock in my kitchen. As I brush my teeth, I ask myself: What will I gain from staying awake instead of going back to bed? The answer is always ‘a lot,’ because a couple extra hours of uninterrupted time is enormous, whether it’s spent at a desk or in the gym.” — Adam Griffin, founder of Bodeefit

8. Prep your clothes—and a playlist.

“The more I like my outfit, the more excited I am to put it on! Also, I always have an excellent playlist. For me, music dictates the way and the intensity in which I move.” — Bree Branker, Flywheel NYC instructor

(Find your perfect workout playlist at Fit Radio)


9. Wear red and grab a mint.

“Most of my workout clothes are red. The color’s known to increase excitement, energy levels, and circulation, and for me it really works to get me going. I also pop in a peppermint Altoid, which I’ve done ever since my collegiate track and field days. Peppermint can create alertness, which is something I need running through Central Park in the early a.m. The only thing that I haven’t mastered is remembering my keys, which sometimes makes my workouts a bit longer than originally planned.” — Jay Cardiello, celebrity trainer

10. Coffee = life.

“I drink as much coffee as I can (if they made coffee IV injections, I’d buy ‘em) to get my zombie-like body out the door before it knows what’s happening to it.” [Editor’s note: After all, we can have more caffeine than we thought!] — Alyx Brown, Chiropractic physician at Manhattan’s Urban Wellness Clinic

Check out the rest of the list here.

Tips for Running With Your Pet

By Maire,


With the weather cooling down for fall, there’s never been a better time to try out a new outdoor workout, like running outside! If you need a companion to keep you accountable, look no further than fido. With the right preparation and gear, dogs can make great running partners, not to mention it will benefit you both! If you’re both new to the sport, here are our tips to getting started.


Consult Your Doctor and Vet

Just like we suggest consulting a doctor before beginning any new exercise regimen, we also recommend talking to your pooch’s vet before taking him out on runs. Some breeds may not be able to handle the stress on their joints, and your vet is the best person to consult if your dog is in good enough shape to take on this new activity.


Invest in the Right Gear

Talk to your local pet store about the best running leash for your pet based on size, weight and strength. Also consider grabbing a couple of pet-friendly extras, like a collapsible water bowl and treat holder for keeping them focused on the trail.


Start Small

Building up stamina takes time, for humans and dogs! Be sure to start with a smaller goal, like taking long walks or alternating between jogging and walking at a steady pace. Finding your pace together is important for longevity and preventing long-term injuries in you both!


Practice, Practice, Practice

Consistency is key for your and your pup’s success. Make a calendar of when you anticipate to run with your dog, and keep to those commitments as if they were as serious as keeping plans with a friend– they’re counting on you!

Woman and dog running toward the sun on summer beach in a beautiful golden sunset. Sport girl and her pet training together.

For more tips on running with your dog, check out this piece for specific training tips to use during a run.

For the best Running playlists head to Fit Radio. Learn more about Fit Radio’s new Running feature for groundbreaking pace-matching technology here.

3 Ways to Boost Your Health This Fall

By Maire,

Boost Health This Fall

A Fall Wellness Routine To Boost Your Health

by: Dolores Baretta

The leaves are blowing in the wind. The sun is setting earlier, and the air has a certain crispness to it. The yang, or hot energy of summer has started to wane, and fall is in the air!

Fall is an important transitional time from summer, the most yang time of the year, to the densest yin season of winter. Everything starts to slow down and turn inward and descend. Nature is consolidating and disintegrating, returning to the soil so as to nourish the earth and allow it time to become fertile again. The yang energy of summer still hangs in the wind, though, as the harvest begins.

Get prepared

Foods now need to be eaten warm, cooking time is extended, and foods are prepared for the winter. Cooking methods include braising, pressure cooking, or slow-cooking, like for soups.

Vegetables and fruits are being picked and prepared for preserving to make your food last throughout the winter. Fall foods are warming and pungent. Vegetables like peppers, onions, cabbage, and tomatoes are prepared to be bottled.

Herbs can also be dried, like dill, parsley, and rosemary. Fruits that are ripe in autumn are apples, pears, and figs while vegetables like parsnip, Brussels sprouts, pumpkin, and winter squash also come into season.

The organs of the fall season in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) are the lungs and large intestine. You can nourish the lungs and large intestine by including mushroom, garlic, sweet potato, ginger, onion, cabbage, pears, walnuts, leeks, radish, miso, soybeans, cinnamon, celery, mustard greens, apricot, apples, grapes, coriander, turnip, taro, Brussels sprouts and grains like quinoa, rice, and oats into your diet.
If you take a look at the nature of the foods that support the lungs, you find that they are a mix of sweet and pungent. While the sweet nourishes, the lungs need pungent foods so as to ensure that chi (energy) and blood are circulating, and therefore the energy doesn’t stagnate and produce phlegm.

It’s important to remember while the lungs take in the new (fresh air), the large intestine is responsible for eliminating and releasing waste. This is best done by drinking adequate water and adding foods that lubricate.

Get organized

The element for fall in TCM is metal. As metal is associated with organization, this is a good time to get your life in order and finish outstanding projects.

For those who find it difficult to let go, autumn can pose a problem, as this is a time to “release” the long summer days and outdoor living and move inward, becoming more mindful and reflective.

The summer furniture needs to be packed away. The house needs to be cleaned thoroughly, rid of dust mites, and rearranged for indoor living.

The lungs are the most vulnerable of the organs, as they are superficial and in the closest contact with the outside. The lungs control the Wei Qi, our protective barrier, which circulates on the exterior of the body, protecting us from external pathogens.

A weak Wei Qi allows viruses or bacteria to enter the body, giving us a cold or the flu, so nourish and protect your Wei Qi by dressing and eating warm and ensuring you’re sleeping in a clutter- and dust-free environment.

Get going

The emotion of the lungs is sadness and grief. Long reflective walks while breathing deep into your lungs will help to release any pressure you have weighing on your chest and give you time to reflect on the past events of summer while working through ways to deal with them.

The lungs are in control of warming the muscles and the skin and has an opening through the nose. Often when we are sad, breathing becomes very superficial and therefore the lungs do not get the air they need. This leads to a constrictive feeling some may feel when sad or grieving.

As the temperature cools, this is the perfect time to go out for a slow jog or a long hike, to breathe deeply into the lungs, so as to release the blocked energy and reoxygenate the body.

Fall requires good planning and motivation as you move into a new stage in your life. Don’t look sadly on the cold seasons. This is a time for you to look introspectively and take time for yourself.

Fit Radio Success Story – Meet Jennifer T.

By Maire,

Fit Radio Success Story

Meet Jennifer T.

Fit Radio is EXACTLY what I have been looking for. I love that I have the ability to let the app detect my pace for my “jogging” days and generate my BPM target rate to help me maintain my pace on “running” days. The controls are really intuitive and easy to set up by target pace and genre.

Fit Radio Success Story
I saw a Facebook Ad for Fit Radio. I just completed a great 10K race, but I was frustrated with the playlists I had cobbled together on Apple Music. Not being a big Trance or EDM music fan, I wasn’t crazy about the few 170 BPM running albums I found in my search either. In the past, I tried a couple different music apps that claimed to work with my playlists and music library, but they didn’t sync correctly with my Apple Music subscription and they didn’t offer their own mixes.


The ad for Fit Radio popped up in my feed and I figured, “It’s worth a shot,” but I never expected to be “wowed” by it. I’m so glad I clicked! The different genres make it so easy to quickly choose music that fits my mood. Being able to choose mixes based on my BPM helps me keep a steady running pace. I love the integrated timing, distance, and cadence features too. (Which also save me from draining battery life by opening other fitness apps.) I have a feeling my next races will have much better soundtracks!


Do you love Fit Radio? Tell us about your experience for your chance to be featured! Click here to learn how.

15 Best Superfoods for Fall

By Maire,

Fall Superfoods

These amazing seasonal foods are the perfect excuse to visit your local farmers market.

Fall superfoods

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!



Sweet or tart, apples are satisfying eaten raw or baked into a delicious dish. Just be sure to eat the skin—it contains hearty-healthy flavonoids. Health benefits include:

• Full of antioxidants
• 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving

Harvest season: August-November

Brussels sprouts

Made the correct way, these veggies taste divine. They have a mild, somewhat bitter taste, so combine them with tangy or savory sauces, like balsamic vinegar. Health benefits include:

• 1/2 cup contains more than your DRI of vitamin K
• Very good source of folate
• Good source of iron

Harvest season: September–March


Though these veggies may resemble carrots, they have a lighter color and sweeter, almost nutty flavor. Use them to flavor rice and potatoes or puree them into soups and sauces. Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• Good source of fiber

Harvest season: October–April



The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out their fabulous flavor, so try them baked or poached. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C and copper
• 4 grams of fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–February


A cross between a turnip and a cabbage, rutabagas are a popular Swedish dish. To utilize their earthy flavor, add them to casseroles, puree them with turnips and carrots to make a sweet soup, or roast them with ginger, honey, or lemon. Health benefits include:

• Good source of fiber
• Good source of vitamin C

Harvest season: October–April


The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of cauliflower is perfect for winter side dishes. It’s wonderful steamed, but it can also be blended to create a mashed potato-like texture or pureed into soup. Health benefits include:

• Compounds that may help to prevent cancer
• Phytonutrients may lower cholesterol” “Excellent source of vitamin C

Harvest season: September–June


Unlike summer squash, winter squash has a fine texture and a slightly sweet flavor. Because of its thick skin, it can be stored for months. It tastes best with other fall flavorings, like cinnamon and ginger. Health benefits include:

• Contains omega-3 fatty acids
• Excellent source of vitamin A

Harvest season: October–February


A type of winter squash, pumpkin can be used for much more than jack-o’-lanterns. Its sweet taste and moist texture make it ideal for pies, cakes, and even pudding! Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• More than 20% of your DRI of fiber
• Good source of B vitamins

Harvest season: October–February


Sweet potatoes

These veggies are for much more than Thanksgiving casseroles. More nutritionally dense than their white-potato counterparts, try roasting them—they’ll taste delicious, and you may maintain more vitamins than boiling. Health benefits include:

• Excellent source of vitamin A
• Good source of iron
• Anti-inflammatory benefits

Harvest season: September–December


Tender and mild, these root vegetables are a great alternative to radishes and cabbage. To flavor these veggies, use fennel, bread crumbs, or even brown sugar. Turnip leaves, which taste like mustard leaves, are easy to cook and dense in nutrients. Health benefits include:

• The roots are a good source of vitamin C
• Turnip leaves are an excellent source of vitamins A, K, and folate

Harvest season: September–April

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15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Best Tips For Getting In Shape

By Maire,


15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Their Best Tips For Getting In Shape –  – BuzzFeed

So you want to eat healthier and get in shape? That’s great! Learn from some people who’ve definitely been there.

Getting into shape and living a healthier lifestyle can be seriously daunting.

That’s why BuzzFeed Life reached out to people who’ve been there to ask them to share their advice. For one guy, that meant learning a way to trick himself into using the spin bike more often. For another woman, that meant transforming her eating and fitness habits, losing over 150 pounds, and getting her diabetes and blood pressure under control.

Whether you’re looking to make a big change in your life or a few small ones, you can probably use some of the tips these former couch potatoes shared. And if you’ve made a healthy living change in your own life, share it with everyone in the comments!

1. Make it easy for yourself to workout in the mornings.

“I never exercised. Very rarely. I knew I needed to because I needed the outlet for stress, and I wasn’t sleeping well. But I also didn’t want to exercise after work, because I’d always want to go out with friends, or come home and relax and just watch TV. So I knew I needed to try morning exercises if I was going to fit it into my day.

Here’s how I do it: When I get home from work I lay out my exercise clothes. I fill a bottle of water and put it in the fridge. I pack the outfit I’m going to wear to work the next day. I pack everything — makeup, shoes, outfit — have it all ready to go, and then set my alarm for the next morning. I do everything I need to do before I start to unwind. This forces me to just get up and do it, and not have to take the time to find everything or make excuses for why I can’t.”
—Cat Fuentes, 28

2. Master the art of portion control.


“It hasn’t happened overnight, but in the past seven years or so I’ve lost over 70 pounds. I’m about to run in the New York City Marathon on Sunday — it’ll be my second marathon. Back 70 pounds ago, I never could’ve dreamed that.

Tricks for myself, in terms of weight loss: Portion control is huge when you’re trying to lose weight. I’ve never been someone who wants to cut something out completely, so I had to figure out a way to allow myself little indulgences. I still go to restaurants, but now I’m all about tapas-style dining, which allows me to try a little of everything. It’s something I’ve gotten myself into that allows me to eat better without sacrificing my lifestyle.

Another tip: I snack throughout the day to keep up my energy, so I keep healthy things by my desk. My trick is making sure the snacks are in reasonable portion sizes, so I’m not just mindlessly munching on them all day.”
—Emily Abbate, 26

Emily Abbate is an editor at Fitbie, where she writes about health and fitness. She’s also been actively training for the 2014 New York City Marathon, and has beendocumenting her progress in a video series on Fitbie.

3. Get enough sleep.


“I had a breast reduction a couple months after I graduated high school, and then moved to Chicago to start college. Once I was out on my own, I had to learn to cook, which is typically healthier than dining out. And because of my class schedule, I had a lot of time on my hands to workout. Now that I no longer had HUGE BOOBS, working out was easier/more fun.

My number one tip for living healthier is to get enough sleep every night. You cannot eat healthy or stay motivated if you’re really tired. Sleep is legitimately the basis of all my healthy decisions. I just set a bedtime and stuck to it. Also, setting the alarm on your phone is really good for creating a new bedtime routine. Like if you need to be in bed sleeping at 11 p.m., set an alarm for 10:15 to remind you to like… stop checking Facebook and go wash your face. And sort of related: Unplug before bed. I put my phone in airplane mode to sleep better.”
—Rachel Miller, 29

4. Don’t aim for perfection.

“In 2007 I lost about 80 pounds, and then in 2012 gained most of it back. I wanted to get back in shape, so I decided to try running every day. And I was maybe running half a mile, maybe a mile at the most — I wasn’t good at it. I gave up about three times, saying, “It’s not working out, I’m not good at it,” and just went back to doing nothing.

I had a friend who lost 100 pounds running. And she helped to hold me accountable to get in shape. She would send me texts and Facebook messages saying, “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” That became my motto. Every time I didn’t want to get up: “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” So I started running every day.

I run probably three times a week now, I go to a simulated surfboard class three to four times a week, and I swim three to four times a week. And I’m so happy I do — I feel great.”
—Laura Prescott, 30

5. Find a workout you love — that way it doesn’t feel like a chore, and it’s something you’re excited to do.

“I was never active or in shape… at all. I had years of failed attempts at fitness that mostly included running on the treadmill and failing at the gym. After a doctor ordered me to quit drinking, I needed an outlet to keep me sober. I looked into hip-hop dancing but felt out of place and hated it.

I used to pass a Krav Maga school every day on the way to work. One day, I stopped in for a trial class and signed up for membership that day. Feeling empowered and excited, I went four times a week. I was hooked. Not long after I started, they invited me to join the instructor program. After weeks of grueling training, I completed it — an accomplishment my 220 pounds, 20-year-old self would never have imagined.”
—Ben Ronne, 34

6. Try to do some form of exercise for 30 minutes (or three miles) every day.


“I suffer from body dysmorphia, and consequently I really abused my body like crazy. Whether it was overeating, eating the wrong things, or eating to stuff my emotions down. I was also drinking a lot. Those habits didn’t go away when I became a trainer, and I felt like a humongous hypocrite. As time went on, I realized that I had a responsibility to my clients to walk the walk and talk the talk. I needed to make changes.

My big tip is consistency is key to getting in shape. The rule I set for myself (and that I set for my clients) is Thirty by Three: 30 minutes a day of some sort of exercise, whether that’s walking for 30 minutes, or five exercises that last about five minutes each with some breaks in between. OR you do three miles of something — three miles on a treadmill, elliptical, hiking. Sometimes an hour feels like just way too much, but 30 minutes always feels attainable.

For the past eight years, since I began focusing on my health, I’ve remained consistent — my body has stayed the same weight, I’m healthy, I’m a normal weight, I’m fit, and I’ve maintained it, and that’s what matters to me.”
—Kit Rich, 31

Kit Rich, an NASM certified personal trainer, is a Los Angeles-based celebrity pilates trainer. She’s been featured in Vogue, SHAPE, SELF, Women’s Health, Real Simple, US Weekly, and Pilates Style. She’s also made appearances on Access Hollywood, Access Hollywood LIVE!, E! News, E!Online, EXTRA, and The Today Show. She blogs regularly for

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A Beginner’s Guide to Getting in Shape

By Maire,


A Beginner’s Guide to Getting in Shape – by Steve –

You woke up today and looked in the mirror.

And you said to yourself, “Gosh darnit (or #$^@  $#@$@%), I’m going to get in shape!”

Just one problem – you don’t quite know HOW.

It’s okay; we’ve all been there.   This might be the first, tenth, or the fiftieth time you’ve tried to lose weight and get healthy.  Sure, things didn’t work last time, or the time before that, or even the time before that…”but things are going to be different THIS time,” right?

So you hop on the internet, search “how to lose weight,” and see 7.8 billion websites that promise you fast results with minimal effort.  You get overwhelmed, intimidated, and then go back to playing Modern Warfare 3 or Hello Kitty 2: Island Adventure.

Somehow, you stumbled across Nerd Fitness…which means there is hope for you yet 🙂

By the end of this article, you’re going to know exactly how to get in shape.

Get your act together

First and foremost, if you suck at life…it’s time to stop.

I know it.  You know it.  Even your mom knows it (she called me).

So let’s get started.  Think back to the last time(s) you tried to get in shape and lose weight.  How successful were you?  What made you fall off the wagon?  Congratulations, you already know what “get in shape” method doesn’t work for you.

They say the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.  Unless you’re insane, don’t try to get in shape the same way you did last time…it’ AIN’T gonna work!  If you counted calories, ran on a treadmill, did kickboxing, tried starving yourself, or whatever, and you’re not happy with the results, it’s time to try something new.

May I recommend the Nerd Fitness method of success: the Triforce of Winning!  Well, I just came up with that title, but now that’s what I’ll call it henceforth.  If you want to succeed at changing your life, you need three things:

  • Education: know HOW to get in shape
  • Inspiration: know WHY you’re getting in shape
  • Support: having others help you along the way to get in shape

If you can successfully combine these three crucial pieces, then you’lldefeat Ganon and save Hyrule have a fightin’ chance at getting in the best damn shape of your life.


1) If you made some New Year’s Resolutions for 2012, make sure they don’t suck.  Be incredibly specific with your goals so that you can actively plan what steps are needed to achieve those goals.  Alternatively, if you somebody that NEVER succeeds at your goals, instead try making a new habit every 30 days…put the focus on the habit and not the goal.

Whichever method you decide, it’s important to be deliberate in your actions:

  • If you are setting goals – be SUPER SPECIFIC, write them down, and plan them out.
  • If you are making new habits – add them to your calendar, set phone alarms or alerts, and do them EVERY DAY.
  • Understand that Rome wasn’t built in a day, and Optimus Prime didn’t transform in one move.  This is NOT a diet, or a quick fix, but a LIFESTYLE CHANGE.  Don’t expect overnight results, or abs in two weeks.  Slow, steady progress.

2) Identify your kryptonite.  If you tried to get in shape in the past and failed, it’s important to know WHY.  Did you get sick and give up after a few days?  Did you go on vacation and say “why bother?”  Maybe you just got bored?  If you sucked at getting in shape last time, educate yourself on the hurdles and kryptonite that made you suck, and work on either avoiding those pitfalls or develop methods to deal with them.

3) Clean up your diet.  Believe it or not, 80% of your success when it comes to getting healthy will depend on your diet – unless you are running marathons on a daily basis, you cannot outrun your fork, and you can’t out-train a bad diet.  I honestly cannot stress the importance of this enough.  Whether you want to count calories, cut out certain foods, or attempt a new diet all together, this is the most important step you can take:

Now, most people suck at eating better because they try to make TOO many changes at once, their stomach freaks out and they run back to their comfort foods.  My advice?  Pick one food change every few weeks, and stick with it.  Whether it’s eating less calories per day, drinking one less soda, eating more vegetables or cooking your own meal once a week…small changes can lead to big successes in the long run.

4) Find an activity that makes you happy, and do it all of the time.  Do you like to run?  Awesome, do that (just do it right).  Do you like to lift weights?  Awesome, make sure your workouts don’t suck.   Maybe you like yoga, or dodgeball, or Ultimate Frisbee, or rock climbing, or whatever!  If you tell me that “I don’t like to exercise,” then you just haven’t found the activity that makes you happy yet.

We’re genetically designed to be active.  If you don’t like to move, then it’s time to try new things until you find something that you DO like.  Sign up for a new class, join your company’s running club for a day, try out something in your basement or living room, just keep trying new stuff until you find something that you like.  And then do it as often as you can.

Remember, your diet is 80% of your success or failure.   Exercising regularly will help you build muscle, strengthen your heart, lose weight, increase your endurance, stamina, and/or flexibility.  On top of that, regular exercise keeps your mind thinking healthy, which in turn will keep your stomach thinking healthy, which will cause your mouth to want to continue eating healthy foods.  It’s the circle of life, sucka.

Now, if you want specific direction on weight lifting, weight loss, or running, I’ve offer a few premium resources on Nerd Fitness.  Yes, they cost money, but they work.  These guides have helped hundreds upon hundreds of NF readers transform their lives.  Each guide comes with specific workout plans depending on your fitness level, video demonstration of exercises, and more…they all come with 1-year, 100% money-back guarantees as well.

  • Rebel Fitness Guide: a fitness guide for beginners who want specific diet and exercise advice.
  • Rebel Strength Guide: a guide for people looking to build strength and muscle, either bulking up or slimming down
  • Rebel Running Guide: a guide for new runners who want to have fun while AVOIDING INJURY

If you want to buy more than one guide, email me for combo pricing.

If you’re more of a do-it-yourself kind of person, you can build your own workout, or get started with a free resource like my Angry Birds workout.  The important thing is to GET STARTED, and then try to get better each time.

5) Put it all together:  These are the steps you can take today:

  • Determine your goals or habits you want to establish.  Write them down and hang them up.
  • Determine why you sucked in the past and how you can avoid it in the future.
  • Start cleaning up your diet in whatever method works best for you.
  • Pick an activity that makes you happy, and do it.  A lot.


WHY do you want to get in shape?  What is your reason for wanting to do so? Do you want to get in shape to…

  • Impress a cute coworker?
  • Win a weight loss competition at work?
  • Eventually play with your newborn son?
  • Grow old with your significant other?
  • Prove everybody wrong who said “you can’t do it?”

Have a freaking reason, friend!  Write it down, hang it up in your bedroom, have a calendar alert pop up every day, whatever.  But keep that reason for wanting a better life at the front of your mind at all times.

Many people get inspired by reading success stories of folks like them.

Lucky for you, Fit Radio has plenty of them on our blog.


Last but not least, you need support.

Yes, I understand its kind of fun to be an army of one: the lone ranger trying to succeed against insurmountable odds….but it’s not necessary.

Once you decide to get in shape, want to know the best way to guarantee success?  Make it public.  Tell all of your friends, start a blog, and/or inform your co-workers and ask them to keep you accountable!  Unless you like being called a quitter, you’ll probably think twice about skipping out on your workouts.

Maybe your word isn’t your bond, and you need a different kind of motivation and support to succeed.  Try money.  My buddy Saint said he would pay his friends $500 if he didn’t get in absolutely incredible shape for his wedding six months down the road.  Saint didn’t have $500 to lose, so he decided instead to just get in great shape…and it worked.

Build your own Jedi Council – find people who are stronger than you and work out with them, or faster than you and run with them, or more educated than you and ask them questions.  These are people that you can turn to when you need advice or help.  If you don’t know anybody in real life, keep reading…

Find a workout buddy!  There are going to be days when you want to sleep in and skip your workout.  There will be afternoons following a crappy day of work where all you want to do is play Halo.  Find somebody who’s at a similar level of fitness as you, and work out with them!  He/she will push you on days when you’re dragging, and vice versa.  You can inspire and support each other, feed off of each other’s success, and offer up tough love when the complaining gets too much (and yes, there will be complaining).


Read more about how Fit Radio, the number 1 fitness music app, is designed to help keep you motivated and reach your fitness goals here.