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15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Best Tips For Getting In Shape

By Maire,

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15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Their Best Tips For Getting In Shape –  – BuzzFeed

So you want to eat healthier and get in shape? That’s great! Learn from some people who’ve definitely been there.

Getting into shape and living a healthier lifestyle can be seriously daunting.

That’s why BuzzFeed Life reached out to people who’ve been there to ask them to share their advice. For one guy, that meant learning a way to trick himself into using the spin bike more often. For another woman, that meant transforming her eating and fitness habits, losing over 150 pounds, and getting her diabetes and blood pressure under control.

Whether you’re looking to make a big change in your life or a few small ones, you can probably use some of the tips these former couch potatoes shared. And if you’ve made a healthy living change in your own life, share it with everyone in the comments!

1. Make it easy for yourself to workout in the mornings.

“I never exercised. Very rarely. I knew I needed to because I needed the outlet for stress, and I wasn’t sleeping well. But I also didn’t want to exercise after work, because I’d always want to go out with friends, or come home and relax and just watch TV. So I knew I needed to try morning exercises if I was going to fit it into my day.

Here’s how I do it: When I get home from work I lay out my exercise clothes. I fill a bottle of water and put it in the fridge. I pack the outfit I’m going to wear to work the next day. I pack everything — makeup, shoes, outfit — have it all ready to go, and then set my alarm for the next morning. I do everything I need to do before I start to unwind. This forces me to just get up and do it, and not have to take the time to find everything or make excuses for why I can’t.”
—Cat Fuentes, 28

2. Master the art of portion control.

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“It hasn’t happened overnight, but in the past seven years or so I’ve lost over 70 pounds. I’m about to run in the New York City Marathon on Sunday — it’ll be my second marathon. Back 70 pounds ago, I never could’ve dreamed that.

Tricks for myself, in terms of weight loss: Portion control is huge when you’re trying to lose weight. I’ve never been someone who wants to cut something out completely, so I had to figure out a way to allow myself little indulgences. I still go to restaurants, but now I’m all about tapas-style dining, which allows me to try a little of everything. It’s something I’ve gotten myself into that allows me to eat better without sacrificing my lifestyle.

Another tip: I snack throughout the day to keep up my energy, so I keep healthy things by my desk. My trick is making sure the snacks are in reasonable portion sizes, so I’m not just mindlessly munching on them all day.”
—Emily Abbate, 26

Emily Abbate is an editor at Fitbie, where she writes about health and fitness. She’s also been actively training for the 2014 New York City Marathon, and has beendocumenting her progress in a video series on Fitbie.

3. Get enough sleep.

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“I had a breast reduction a couple months after I graduated high school, and then moved to Chicago to start college. Once I was out on my own, I had to learn to cook, which is typically healthier than dining out. And because of my class schedule, I had a lot of time on my hands to workout. Now that I no longer had HUGE BOOBS, working out was easier/more fun.

My number one tip for living healthier is to get enough sleep every night. You cannot eat healthy or stay motivated if you’re really tired. Sleep is legitimately the basis of all my healthy decisions. I just set a bedtime and stuck to it. Also, setting the alarm on your phone is really good for creating a new bedtime routine. Like if you need to be in bed sleeping at 11 p.m., set an alarm for 10:15 to remind you to like… stop checking Facebook and go wash your face. And sort of related: Unplug before bed. I put my phone in airplane mode to sleep better.”
—Rachel Miller, 29

4. Don’t aim for perfection.

“In 2007 I lost about 80 pounds, and then in 2012 gained most of it back. I wanted to get back in shape, so I decided to try running every day. And I was maybe running half a mile, maybe a mile at the most — I wasn’t good at it. I gave up about three times, saying, “It’s not working out, I’m not good at it,” and just went back to doing nothing.

I had a friend who lost 100 pounds running. And she helped to hold me accountable to get in shape. She would send me texts and Facebook messages saying, “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” That became my motto. Every time I didn’t want to get up: “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” So I started running every day.

I run probably three times a week now, I go to a simulated surfboard class three to four times a week, and I swim three to four times a week. And I’m so happy I do — I feel great.”
—Laura Prescott, 30

5. Find a workout you love — that way it doesn’t feel like a chore, and it’s something you’re excited to do.

“I was never active or in shape… at all. I had years of failed attempts at fitness that mostly included running on the treadmill and failing at the gym. After a doctor ordered me to quit drinking, I needed an outlet to keep me sober. I looked into hip-hop dancing but felt out of place and hated it.

I used to pass a Krav Maga school every day on the way to work. One day, I stopped in for a trial class and signed up for membership that day. Feeling empowered and excited, I went four times a week. I was hooked. Not long after I started, they invited me to join the instructor program. After weeks of grueling training, I completed it — an accomplishment my 220 pounds, 20-year-old self would never have imagined.”
—Ben Ronne, 34

6. Try to do some form of exercise for 30 minutes (or three miles) every day.

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“I suffer from body dysmorphia, and consequently I really abused my body like crazy. Whether it was overeating, eating the wrong things, or eating to stuff my emotions down. I was also drinking a lot. Those habits didn’t go away when I became a trainer, and I felt like a humongous hypocrite. As time went on, I realized that I had a responsibility to my clients to walk the walk and talk the talk. I needed to make changes.

My big tip is consistency is key to getting in shape. The rule I set for myself (and that I set for my clients) is Thirty by Three: 30 minutes a day of some sort of exercise, whether that’s walking for 30 minutes, or five exercises that last about five minutes each with some breaks in between. OR you do three miles of something — three miles on a treadmill, elliptical, hiking. Sometimes an hour feels like just way too much, but 30 minutes always feels attainable.

For the past eight years, since I began focusing on my health, I’ve remained consistent — my body has stayed the same weight, I’m healthy, I’m a normal weight, I’m fit, and I’ve maintained it, and that’s what matters to me.”
—Kit Rich, 31

Kit Rich, an NASM certified personal trainer, is a Los Angeles-based celebrity pilates trainer. She’s been featured in Vogue, SHAPE, SELF, Women’s Health, Real Simple, US Weekly, and Pilates Style. She’s also made appearances on Access Hollywood, Access Hollywood LIVE!, E! News, E!Online, EXTRA, and The Today Show. She blogs regularly for Beautylish.com.

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How Fat Turns to Muscle Through Exercise

By Maire,

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How Exercise Changes Fat and Muscle Cells

BY: Gretchen ReynoldsNY Times

Exercise promotes health, reducing most people’s risks of developing diabetes and growing obese. But just how, at a cellular level, exercise performs this beneficial magic — what physiological steps are involved and in what order — remains mysterious to a surprising degree.

Several striking new studies, however, provide some clarity by showing that exercise seems able to drastically alter how genes operate.

Genes are, of course, not static. They turn on or off, depending on what biochemical signals they receive from elsewhere in the body. When they are turned on, genes express various proteins that, in turn, prompt a range of physiological actions in the body.

One powerful means of affecting gene activity involves a process called methylation, in which methyl groups, a cluster of carbon and hydrogen atoms, attach to the outside of a gene and make it easier or harder for that gene to receive and respond to messages from the body. In this way, the behavior of the gene is changed, but not the fundamental structure of the gene itself. Remarkably, these methylation patterns can be passed on to offspring – a phenomenon known as epigenetics.

What is particularly fascinating about the methylation process is that it seems to be driven largely by how you live your life. Many recent studies have found that diet, for instance, notably affects the methylation of genes, and scientists working in this area suspect that differing genetic methylation patterns resulting from differing diets may partly determine whether someone develops diabetes and other metabolic diseases.

But the role of physical activity in gene methylation has been poorly understood, even though exercise, like diet, greatly changes the body. So several groups of scientists recently set out to determine what working out does to the exterior of our genes.

The answer, their recently published results show, is plenty.

Of the new studies, perhaps the most tantalizing, conducted principally by researchers affiliated with the Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden and published last month in PLoS One, began by recruiting several dozen sedentary but generally healthy adult Swedish men and sucking out some of their fat cells. Using recently developed molecular techniques, the researchers mapped the existing methylation patterns on the DNA within those cells. They also measured the men’s body composition, aerobic capacity, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and similar markers of health and fitness.

Then they asked the men to start working out. Under the guidance of a trainer, the volunteers began attending hourlong spinning or aerobics classes approximately twice a week for six months. By the end of that time, the men had shed fat and inches around their waists, increased their endurance and improved their blood pressure and cholesterol profiles.

Less obviously, but perhaps even more consequentially, they also had altered the methylation pattern of many of the genes in their fat cells. In fact, more than 17,900 individual locations on 7,663 separate genes in the fat cells now displayed changed methylation patterns. In most cases, the genes had become more methylated, but some had fewer methyl groups attached. Both situations affect how those genes express proteins.

The genes showing the greatest change in methylation also tended to be those that had been previously identified as playing some role in fat storage and the risk for developing diabetes or obesity.

“Our data suggest that exercise may affect the risk for Type 2 diabetes and obesity by changing DNA methylation of those genes,” says Charlotte Ling, an associate professor at Lund University and senior author of the study.

Meanwhile, other studies have found that exercise has an equally profound effect on DNA methylation within human muscle cells, even after a single workout.

To reach that conclusion, scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and other institutions took muscle biopsies from a group of sedentary men and women and mapped their muscle cells’ methylation patterns. They then had the volunteers ride stationary bicycles until they had burned about 400 calories. Some rode strenuously, others more easily.

Afterward, a second muscle biopsy showed that DNA methylation patterns in the muscle cells were already changing after that lone workout, with some genes gaining methyl groups and some losing them. Several of the genes most altered, as in the fat cell study, are known to produce proteins that affect the body’s metabolism, including the risk for diabetes and obesity.

Interestingly, the muscle cell methylation changes were far more pronounced among the volunteers who had ridden vigorously than in those who had pedaled more gently, even though their total energy output was the same.

The overarching implication of the study’s findings, says Juleen Zierath, a professor of integrative physiology at the Karolinska Institute and senior author of the study, is that DNA methylation changes are probably “one of the earliest adaptations to exercise” and drive the bodily changes that follow.

Of course, the intricacies of that bogglingly complex process have yet to be fully teased out. Scientists do not know, for instance, whether exercise-induced methylation changes linger if someone becomes sedentary, or if resistance training has similar effects on the behavior of genes. Nor is it known whether these changes might be passed on from one generation to the next. But already it is clear, Dr. Ling says, that these new findings “are additional proof of the robust effect exercise can have on the human body, even at the level of our DNA.”

10 Reasons Exercising on Vacation is Worth it

By Maire,

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With the last days of summer upon us and the holiday season rapidly approaching, we want to know: Do I really have to workout when I’m on vacation?

It only took a little research to find a clear answer. While it might feel like vacation is the perfect excuse to hit the beach chair rather than the gym, there are actually a ton of benefits to working out on your time off. And best of all, it really doesn’t have to be hard. Here are 10 reasons why you shouldn’t “forget” your running shoes on your next trip.

 

1.It’s meditation in motion.

According to the Mayo Clinic, focusing on a single task, such as physical activity, can result in energy and optimism. It can calm you down and clear your mind. The Fit Radio yoga mixes can help you get in the zone for a relaxing yoga session.

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2. It improves your mood.

Elle Woods said it first: “Exercise gives you endorphins and endorphins make you happy.” And isn’t the whole point of vacation to be happy?

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3. It’s a chance for extra alone time.

We’ve all wished for just five minutes of alone time on family vacation before. Going for a run, or even just a brisk walk, is a great way to enjoy some time to yourself. (Plus, have you tried our new Running Feature?)

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4. Or, it can be a great family activity.

Maybe you just can’t get enough of your loved ones, in which case physical activity is a great way to bond. Plan a family tennis tournament or basketball game. Go for a hike or rent kayaks. No matter the activity, it’ll bring everyone closer together and get everyone’s heart rate up.

 

5. It’s a great way to sightsee.

If you’re in a beautiful location with a lot to see, don’t spend valuable sightseeing time on the treadmill! Run through a local park or on the beach or up a mountain. Use exercise as an opportunity to do things you might not otherwise, like hitting the other side of town or catching the sunrise.

Asian woman running on waterfront path

 

6. It doesn’t have to take long.

Strapped for time? Don’t stress yourself out by trying to fit in an hour-long workout. Exercise trends like HIIT and tabata training can be done in as little as seven minutes and there are plenty of Fit Radio mixes to keep you entertained.

 

7. It doesn’t have to involve any equipment.

Skip taking the elevator and put on Fit Radio’s Stair Climber station as you take the stairs to your room. Workout complete.

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8. It’ll get you outside in the fresh air.

Running outside is reportedly connected with “greater feelings of revitalization and positive engagement, decreases in tension, confusion, anger, and depression, and increased energy.” Plus weather conditions can be a bonus; wind resistance creates a tougher workout and sunny skies provide much needed Vitamin D.

 

9. It will help you sleep.

It’s much-cited fact that exercising can help you sleep better. Vacation workouts will help you not only catch up on sleep, but get better quality sleep.

 

10. It’s part of your routine.

Could you really go a week, or even a long weekend, without listening to your favorite Fit Radio DJs? We sure couldn’t.

The Key to the Perfect Spinning Workout Mix

By Maire,

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Last week, we caught up with DJ Monopoli – a Fit Radio DJ favorite and creator of his wildly popular workout cycling mixes on our ‘Spin’ workout station. But how exactly does he craft these perfect spinning mixes? He broke it all down for us here:

Q: How do you choose your music?

A: I tend to gravitate toward tracks that build into a really intense drop, but also have a very melodic breakdown. I also love digging for unique remixes of classic tracks.

 

Q: How does your mix formula help during Spin classes?

A: Every instructor likes to do things a little bit differently. The general formula consists of a warm up track (something relaxed that allows everyone to get their mind right as they begin to pedal and get warm), followed by something that’s very high energy to get everyone going. After that, I tend to mix it up. I love to use a variety of different genres and tempos to really keep people engaged. More focus on the music = less focus on how bad your legs are burning!  And then I always try to end with a feel good track that leaves everyone in a positive state of mind.

 

Q: What do you think about when you put a spin mix together?

A: I really try to visualize myself being a part of the class so that I can determine which tracks will provide the boost riders need to keep pushing forward.

 

Q: What is most important element in a Spin mix?

A: ENERGY! Every track has to play its part in fueling the riders to keep going. A track’s energy can single-handedly provide that little extra push even when someone thinks they have nothing left. But with that, there must also be balance. People can’t cycle at full speed forever, so the music needs to provide that balance.

 

Q: What feature do you love about Fit Radio?

A: I LOVE having the ability to set my intervals and rest periods. I’m in the gym listening to Fit Radio daily, so setting my intervals really keeps me working at the pace I want to.

 

Q: What are the benefits being a Fit Radio DJ?

A: I really enjoy having the ability to interact with my listeners. Everyday I have new listeners reaching out via Twitter to let me know how much they enjoyed my mixes. That’s what it’s all about and Fit Radio provides that platform.
Learn more about DJ Monopoli and listen to his latest mixes here.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: Treblemonsters

By Maire,

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Our team had a chance to catch up with Fit Radio‘s, Treblemonsters last week. This is what they had to say:

 

Q: Of all your pet-peeves, which is the strangest?

A: Wasteful people. I.e. the ones at the gym that use about 4 towels per person or run through half of a paper towel roll to wipe something small down.

 

Q: What is your favorite animal? Why?

A: Cats. They are clean and do not need much attention. (Like everything else in this world.) Also, most cats have a spontaneous/random/energetic, but innocent personality.

 

Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

A: FIJI

 

Q: What would you do with one million dollars?

A: First, I would just cash it and pile it in my living room to stare at it for a small period of time. Then, invest most of it.

 

Q: Would you rather have money or love? Why?

A: LOVE. Because if we were able to materialize LOVE, than it would be worth much more than MONEY.

 

Q: Are you a good dancer?

A: Rusty now, but yes. I used to break-dance back in the day.

 

Q: What is the best feature about Fit Radio for our users?

A: It’s a mobile app. Anyone can access at anytime and anywhere.

 

Q: What are the perks being a Fit Radio DJ?

A: Other than a good resume builder and exposure, it challenges me as a DJ to come up with new and creative ways to supply high energy mixes in different genres. It steers me away from the generic and overplayed songs.

 

Learn more about Treblemonsters and listen to their latest Fit Radio mixes here.

Fit Radio Success Story – Meet Nathan O.

By Maire,

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I love the Fit Radio app. I downloaded it because, in November, I will be running the NYC Marathon in support of the 75th Army Rangers Lead The Way Fund — a charity established to support the families of wounded and fallen Army Rangers— one of the Army’s most elite fighting forces. I’ve personally served 6 years in the US Army and was deployed overseas for 4 years. I’ve lost many friends in the process so they will be running with me in spirit on that day.

Fit Radio has certainly inspired me and I think it was a quality purchase. The music compilations and mixes from the Fit Radio app serve as additional inspiration and motivation for my training.

If anyone would like to donate to the wives and children of these soldiers, please click here. I would never advocate for a charity I didn’t full-heartedly believe in. This one is a fantastic cause.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: DJ Rolemodel

By Maire,

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This week we had a chance to sit down wth Fit Radio DJ, DJ Rolemodel. This is what he had to say:

 

Q: Of all your pet-peeves, which is the strangest?

A: When people are ordering food and they reach over the sneeze-guard to point at what they want (think Chipotle or Subway).

 

Q: What is your favorite animal? Why?

A: Koala bear. (Probably because it’s the best emoji there is.)

 

Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

A: Venice, Italy or b some small village in Norway overlooking a fjord.

 

Q: Would you rather have money or love? Why?

A: Money, only because I don’t look for love, I create it.

 

Q: Would you consider yourself to be a good dancer?

A: In college I took 5 different dance classes, however, you will never see me dance. (Unless it’s a few head bobs in the DJ booth.)

 

Q: What do you consider to be the best feature about Fit Radio for users?

A: The best feature about Fit Radio is when it updates users to let them know there is a new mix from DJ Rolemodel.

 

Q: How can Fit Radio change your workout?

A: Fit Radio has helped me because I don’t have to worry about the music that’s coming up, I can relax and focus on cardio instead of skipping from song to song.

 

Q: What are the perks being a Fit Radio DJ?

A:  The main perk of being a Fit Radio DJ is the exposure. That and of course having tons of new friends from the ATL.

 

Learn more about DJ Rolemodel and listen to his latest mixes here.

Fit Radio Success Story: The Camp Transformation Center

By Maire,

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Meet Dr. Saman Bakhtiar – the Co-Founder of the The Camp Transformation Center. Dr. Bakhtiar and his trainers use Fit Radio as apart of their training programs in their multiple locations across California.

Dr. Bakhtiar started The Camp Transformation Centers in 2011 for the sole purpose to motivate people to “transform” from the inside out. With this passion and the help of Fit Radio, the centers have done just that!

“We love using Fit Radio because of it’s versatility and song selection. It’s one less things we need to worry about in providing our clients world class service.” – Dr. Bakhtiar

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So far, they have had over 30,000 people who have gone through the program and have completely transformed their lives. Like Fit Radio, the mission of The Camp Transformation Center is to motivate, educate and change lives.

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Recap: Night Nation Run Toronto with DJ Scuffs

By Maire,

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Last week Fit Radio DJ, DJ Scuffs took the Fit Radio stage at Night Nation Run in Toronto – The World’s first-ever Running Music Festival.

 

We had a chance to catch up with DJ Scuffs after the event and here is what he had to say:

Q: What was the Night Nation Run event like?

A: It was a super dope event. So much energy from start to finish. Essentially, it’s a big music festival with a 5K race course going through it. There are multiple sounds and DJs playing all day and through the night with some DJs actually positioned on the course to help keep you pumped and moving all the way to the main stage.

 

Q: Fill in the blank: DJing at Night Nation Run Toronto was _______.

A: An amazing experience, a cool concept, and one of the best events I’ve ever played at and been a part of.

 

Q: When you create a Fit Radio mix, what do you always make sure to do?

A: I always make sure it’s a perfect combination of style, fun, energy, and it keeps you wanting more.

 

Learn more about Night Nation Run and find upcoming runs near you hereFit Radio users get an exclusive $25 admission price (60% off the regular ticket pricing) using the coupon code FITRADIO at checkout for ALL RACES! Click here to find a Night Nation Run near you!

How to Boost Your Metabolism at Any Age

By Maire,

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A Faster Metabolism at Any Age

The secret? Eating more often, sleeping longer, and spending less time working out (really!).

You’d like to do something—anything—to speed up your metabolism, but it’s out of your control. Right? Not quite. Although genetics and your age both play a role, recent studies suggest you have plenty of say over how well your metabolism—which involves your body’s ability to break down food into usable energy—functions.

In fact, you can all but negate the metabolic slowdown that happens after 40 by tweaking your diet, exercise, and sleep habits. “Think of your body as an engine—your metabolism is the rate at which your engine runs,” explains Scott Isaacs, MD, an endocrinologist in Atlanta and author of Hormonal Balance: How to Lose Weight By Understanding Your Hormones and Metabolism. “By making adjustments to these three elements, you can actually make your engine rev higher.”

The eating and exercise plans on these pages were designed to keep your metabolism humming to the tune of up to 10 pounds off in 21 days. Read on for the keys to not only losing, but losing for good.
Key 1: Eat early
Your basal metabolic rate—the number of calories your body burns at rest—is based on things like age, height, and body type, so there isn’t much you can do to alter it. But there is a lot you can do to change the number of calories you burn above that, beginning with your diet. Specifically: Eat breakfast.

We already know the reasons you may not want to (you don’t have the time/energy/stomach for it), but leaving for work on an empty stomach is like hitting the pause button on your metabolism. Here’s why: When your brain senses your stomach is empty, it sends a message to your cells to conserve energy in case another meal doesn’t arrive. In other words, your body holds onto the fat stored in your cells instead of helping you burn it off.

“Breakfast triggers a process called thermogenesis, where the body signals the brain to activate the metabolic process of turning food into energy,” says Mark Hyman, MD, author ofThe Blood Sugar Solution.
Key 2: Eat often
To keep your metabolism humming, Dr. Hyman suggests eating small meals every three or four hours. Aim to make each of those meals at least one-quarter protein—whether it’s animal protein, beans, or dairy, says Marissa Lippert, RD, who designed the eating plan on page 39. A recent study in the journal Neuron suggests that consuming protein stimulates the cells responsible for switching on the body’s calorie-burning mechanism.

Foods high in sugar and processed carbs, on the other hand, can lead to another problem: insulin resistance. “As we get older, it’s crucial to pay attention to how much sugar we’re consuming,” says Diane Kress, RD, author of The Metabolism Miracle. “Too much messes with your metabolism by causing your body to store extra calories as fat.”

 

Key 3: Sweat off the weight
Even more important? Exercise. “Not only does it affect your metabolism while you’re doing it, but research shows you can keep burning calories up to 24 hours after you finish because your metabolism stays elevated,” Dr. Isaacs says.

That’s especially true if you challenge yourself: A new study in the journal Cell Metabolismsuggests that intense bouts of exercise can “turn on” genes responsible for energy metabolism. Researchers found that the activation of these fat- burning genes was higher in cyclists who pedaled at 80 percent of their aerobic capacity versus those who did a more moderate cycling session at 40 percent. So although you can’t permanently change your DNA (if only!), experts say exercise can fire up certain genes that initiate the fat-burning process.

Exercise is particularly helpful once you pass the age of 40, when your metabolism naturally begins to slow down. Experts used to believe it slowed due to an inevitable loss of muscle mass. However, a study in the journal The Physician and Sports Medicine found that fit women ages 41 to 81 who continued to exercise four to five times a week as they got older had little change in body composition. The real reason you lose muscle with age? You stop using it. “We now know that women who keep up a regular vigorous fitness routine don’t experience the metabolic decrease,” Dr. Isaacs says.

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Key 4: Sleep away the pounds
No, it’s not your imagination. Too little sleep can cause you to gain—and not just because you’re spending those extra waking hours in front of the TV nursing a bag of chips. Research suggests that people who sleep two-thirds of their usual amount (five hours instead of eight, say) eat an average of 549 extra calories the following day without realizing it. Experts believe this is because too few zzz’s upset the balance of important appetite-regulating hormones.

But that’s not all: A Swedish study found that even one night of disrupted sleep can cause the body to burn up to 20 percent fewer calories the following day. “Sleep deprivation impacts multiple hormones related to metabolism,” Dr. Isaacs says. “Resistance to leptin—a hormone that regulates body weight—increases, while levels of ghrelin, a hormone that signals to your brain that you’re hungry, also increase.”

Aim for seven to eight hours of pillow time a night, advises Dr. Hyman. “Just a small change in your sleep schedule can make a big difference in your health.” Not to mention your ability to burn calories.

 

(Article Source: Health.com)