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The Ultimate Guide to 10 Different Types of Yoga

By Maire,

yoga-for-beginners-2

How to find the best class for you.

by Jake Panasevich

When I first started yoga, I wanted a fast-paced, physical and sweaty flow class. After a few months, I tried other styles, but they were hit or miss. In one class I ended up in, for example, the teacher talked about philosophy and led us in chants for nearly half the time. I was confused, bored and in pain from sitting cross-legged. If that had been my first experience with yoga, I’m not sure I would have continued.

If you are looking to get into a yoga routine this fall, choosing from all the different styles can be overwhelming. Studios offer more variations of yoga than ever before, but don’t let all the trends and gimmicky classes distract you. Be clear about what your goals are before you choose your path. Once you know what you want, choose a program that fits you best. Here’s how:

Yoga for the Athlete

  • Flow: If you want to get in shape and tone up without bulking up, an exercise-heavy flow class is a good choice. When I first started yoga, I lost 40 pounds practicing heated power yoga or hot Vinyasa. These classes include plenty of lunges, core work and pushups, which are effective movements to build strength and burn calories fast. The temperature of a power yoga class is around 90 degrees, and you move very quickly through the poses. It is very fitting for those who want to sweat more and talk less about alignment and philosophy.
  • Fusion: Classes that blend yoga and exercise are popping up everywhere. CorePower Yoga, for instance, is a newer, popular branch of the standard power yoga class. CorePower offers heated flow classes as well as yoga with resistance and weights. The weights will help increase the intensity and help you get a more chiseled physique. However, the stakes are much higher if you misalign. Another fusion of fitness and yoga combines yoga and barre, which involves a workout using a ballet barre. All of these options are focused on physicality and moving quickly to get a workout.
  • Vinyasa: “Vinyasa” can mean many different things – so much so that it is difficult to tell exactly what you are signing up for when you attend a class. However, most Vinyasa classes move briskly in cadence with your breath. These classes are not heated, but that doesn’t mean you won’t get a good workout. While Vinyasa is fun and moving fluidly can be beneficial, these classes are not the best choice if you have an injury or joint pain.
  • Bikram: Bikram yoga is also a very intense method that builds focus. It is a very different physical challenge than Vinyasa. The yoga studio is heated to a sweltering 104 degrees and it is humidified to 40 percent so you break a sweat almost immediately. In Bikram, you practice 26 postures in 90 minutes, and hold the poses for a set amount of time. Bikram teachers repeat the same script each class, and it is the same sequence every time. If you enjoy the intensity of the heat and thrive with consistency, you will excel with Bikram yoga. If you enjoy variety, you should consider a different class.

Yoga for the Engineer

  • Alignment: If you have injuries or tend to be more tight and strong than flexible, an alignment-based class like align and flow, Iyengar or alignment-based Hatha is a good fit. The classes focus on subtleties where you learn by intellectualizing the biomechanical components of the practice. At some point, whether it is from getting hurt or just longing for more depth and knowledge about yoga and the poses, most people eventually seek out a slower, more thought-out, mechanical practice. Each class focuses on key alignment principles that provide insight on how to progress, and they are normally organized around a peak pose or a general focus. Additionally, alignment-based classes are great for beginners. You will move more methodically through poses and hold them longer than in a flow class. Pausing in a posture allows for more depth in a pose. This will provide a completely different challenge than moving at a quick pace.

Yoga for the Poet or Mystic

Yin and restorative yoga are perfect for those who love being still and who just need to stretch, restore and relax. In these classes, you will hold just a couple of positions for long periods of time. Exercise is involved in either style. Sequences are slow-moving and you use props to set up poses in a way that you can hold them for five to 10 minutes and attune them to your breath. If you are already on a grueling workout regimen, this type of yoga is a nice way to recover. By finding stillness in the poses, it becomes more of a meditative practice.

  • Restorative: Restorative is focused on alignment and positioning your body in a way that engages your muscles to protect your joints. This often requires props or using the support of the wall. For example, you may be asked to lie on your back with your legs up the wall for five minutes. This pose encourages students to attune to their breath and body.
  • Yin: Yin is slightly different from restorative yoga in the way instructors teach the poses. In this style class, you settle into the poses and stretch. There is less emphasis on engaging your muscles and, instead, you relax into each position.

Yoga for the Light-Hearted

If you are just looking to try something new and to not take yourself too seriously, there a couple options that are very playful and can be fun to try with a partner:

  • Aerial: If you’re feeling adventurous, you might try this style, in which the teacher helps you move through yoga poses while you are suspended in midair. I recommend trying a beginner’s class first and be willing to laugh at yourself when you fall and enjoy the anti-gravity effect.
  • Acro: Acro yoga normally involves coordination and time to build strength and to learn how to spot your partner. Usually, it takes some time for students to build self-awareness in their own bodies before trying these classes.
  • Partner: Practicing with a friend is helpful to go deeper into your poses. Events are also a fun way to make friends and try a class with a twist. Workshops range from music-themed classes – think metal music paired with Vinyasa – to yoga followed by beer tasting.

 

Find your flow and check out the latest Fit Radio Yoga mixes on our Yoga Station!

Hot Topic: Bikram Yoga

By superadmin,

Carolyn Seaman, Social Media

So, I know this isn’t really new or anything to most people or “yogis” but I have just recently been very interested in Yoga and the benefits it provides in strength and flexibility and the overall health advantages in general. I am not experienced at all and when I do practice yoga I realize I am not nearly as strong or balanced as I thought, a wobbly mess is more like it. I love the challenge though, so naturally I want to push myself to the limit. A girlfriend of mine invited me to join her for her next hot yoga class and I couldn’t be more excited! I think it will definitely be interesting and an awesome learning experience. Reading up on the studios in my neighborhood so once I am able to find time in my hectic schedule, I will be ready to make an appointment! Stay tuned for a follow-up post about my Bikram Yoga experience. Ps. If anybody has any tips or experiences they’d like to share feel free! I am going to need all the help I can get!

Just go ahead and call me Guinea.

By superadmin,

Cari Seaman, Social Media

The premise of my blog posts will basically involve me morphing into a guinea pig and trying out any compelling articles that I come across while tweeting for FIT Radio. These articles feature fun undertakings, such as getting a workout while working at the office by sitting on an exercise ball (to improve posture and strengthen your back/core). This is exactly what I did for an entire week last week! I made notes throughout the process as to how I was adapting to my new fangled “office chair”, and (I have to admit) I am thrilled that the experience of the balance ball is no more.

Looking back at my notes from Monday, I thought it was going to be a piece of cake… maybe even a little fun. Psh! When I got to the office that morning, I pumped up the ball with excitement and looked forward to regaining the posture I had in the days I danced ballet. Dirk, our tech guy, was pretty jealous and kept trying to (unsuccessfully) steal my ball throughout the day.

Some notes I made included, “It might not be a good idea to cross your legs, Cari”. I also jotted down that my back muscles were definitely engaged after the first hour, and by the end of the day, I was convinced I was getting SOME kind of workout (my back was feeling pretty sore and as the hours passed, the harder it got)! The week went by just like the last couple hours of that first day, slowly. It worked my back from between the shoulder blades to all the way down my lower back. However, there were no feelings of soreness in the abdominal region (sad, I know). “TGIF!” We have a shorter workday on Fridays, so when 4:45 PM rolled around that day, I was pumped to trade in the ball for a chair with actual back and arm rests (you really don’t know how much you miss something until it’s gone).

Next time, I will just incorporate the balance ball every so often instead of multiple days in a row. I am happy to report my posture has improved! I sit up straighter at my desk and my posture is even better when I walk. Today, I finally let Dirk have the balance ball; he was already back in his chair after 2 hours! 😉 Ha!

Stay tuned for my next blog post and make sure to follow @FITRadio on twitter so you can give me ideas on what to try next! Also, please feel free to leave comments!! Actually, please DO! 😀