18 Exercise Moves to Tone Your Butt, Thighs, and Legs

By Maire,


Exercises that tighten and tone your legs from butt to ankles and everything in between

Rebecca Toback

Sexy, slim legs

Want mini-skirt worthy legs? These moves will get you there in no time at all. Pick a few moves, or try them all to sculpt your butt, hamstrings, quads, thighs, and calves.

Exercises for sexy, slim legs

Warrior III

This yoga move can tone your legs, and core too.

How to do it: Stand with the feet together, and lift up the left leg with a pointed toe, putting your body weight onto the standing, right leg. Continue to lift your leg and drop the head and torso so they form a straight horizontal line from head to toe with the arms at your sides. Engage your core and make sure the left thigh, hip, and toes are aligned. Remain facing down and keep your back as straight as possible. Ensure your right knee doesn’t lock and center the weight on the middle of the foot. Hold for 5 breaths and then slowly return to standing.

Switch legs and repeat.

Warrior 3

Chair Squat

This is a perfect move for beginners, and we’re betting you’re sitting on the only equipment you need as you read this. Hint: If you have a chair (and your glutes), you’re good to go.

How to do it: Begin standing with your back to a chair, feet hip-width apart. While keeping your weight centered on your heels, draw in your abs and hinge forward at the hips slowly lowering your butt toward the chair. Pause right before you would sit down and return to standing while keeping the core engaged.

Do 3 sets of 10-15 reps.

Chair Squat

Pivoting Curtsy Lunge

How to do it: Standing with feet hip-width apart, step your right foot diagonally behind you and into a 7 o’clock position. Bend both knees so you’re in a lunge stance. Lean your torso forward 30 degrees and pulse up and town 10-15 times. Straighten the body and pivot 180 degrees so your right foot comes to the front. Again, lower into a lunge.

Pulse up and down 10-15 times on each side to complete one set; do 3 sets.

Low Lunge Hover

This standing move exercises both the legs and butt.

How to do it: Stand with feet hip-width apart before stepping your right foot back, and lowering into lunge stance with the left knee over the ankle. Bring your arms over your head and hinge forward from the waist. Lower the chest forward toward the thighs as your arms reach forward. Lift the right leg while straightening the left. Hold for 3 breaths before returning to the starting lunge position.

Do 3 reps; switch legs and repeat.

Skater Lunge

This move exercises the quads, hamstrings, and glutes.

How to do it Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and the arms at your sides. Take a large step backwards with your left leg and cross it diagonally behind the right leg. Meanwhile, extend your right arm out to the side and swing the left arm across the hips. Hop about 2 feet to the left and come back to the beginning stance.

Repeat with the other leg; that’s one set. Do 3 sets of 20 reps.

The Lean

This move works the inner thighs and begins with the same stance as the skater’s lunge.

How to do it: Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and the arms down at your sides. Take a step diagonally back with the right foot. Then, bend sideways from the waist toward the side where your right leg is stretched out, and reach your right arm up and left arm down and back toward your right calf. Return arms to starting position to complete 1 rep.

Do 10 reps, then switch sides and repeat.

Leg Lift

This move targets the quads.

How to do it: While you stand facing a chair, raise your right leg, knee facing up, foot flexed and place your heel on the seat. Make sure not to lock your standing knee as you lift your right foot off the chair and straighten it out until you feel your quadriceps engage. Keeping your lifted leg in the air, bend the leg on the floor slightly and then straighten it again.

Do 10-15 reps, then switch sides and repeat for 1 full set; do 3 sets.

How-to video: Standing Glute Toner

Want a leg-lift exercise to work your glutes? Of course you do. Watch this video to find out how to do it right.

Watch the video: Standing Glute Toner Video  

Two-Thirds Jump Squat

Ready to work your quads and hamstrings? This move will really do the trick.

How to do it: Begin by standing with feet shoulder-width apart, arms at the sides. Lower the body into a squat, going two-thirds of the way down. Immediately jump straight up with your arms pointed up toward the ceiling. When you land, go right back into the next rep.

Do 3 sets of 20 reps each.

Check out the rest of the list here.


Find your perfect playlist for any workout at Fit Radio.

10 Tricks to Avoid Halloween Candy Temptations

By Maire,

Halloween Candy Temptations

Beware those empty calories in the Halloween candy jar.

Halloween unofficially marks the beginning of the holiday feasting season. And for anyone trying to watch his or her weight, the scariest part of Halloween is not ghosts and goblins but the ever-abundant Halloween candy. Sugar and mostly empty calories is what you get in candy, and the truth is that most of us don’t exercise enough to warrant those extra calories.

Those cute little fun-size candy bars seem harmless — and they are, if you can limit your consumption. But that’s easier said than done.

“All it takes is an additional 100 calories a day or the equivalent of one snack-sized chocolate bar and most adults will experience weight creep before they even know it,” says Lona Sandon, MEd, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

When your cupboards are loaded with candy and the kids come home with bags full of even more treats, it’s hard to resist. Many people try to lessen the temptation at home by bringing their extra candy into work, thus setting a high-calorie trap for their co-workers.

“Don’t get sucked into the ‘see food diet’ mentality that makes you want to eat the candy simply because you see it and not because you are hungry,” says Brian Wansink, PhD, a Cornell researcher and author ofMindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. “We eat more of visible foods because it causes us to think about it more, and every time you see the candy bowl you have to decide whether … you want a piece of candy or not.

“Simply thinking of food can make you hungry, so when you see or smell something associated with food, like the shiny foil-wrapped Kisses, it can actually make you salivate.”

But there are ways to keep your hands out of the candy jar so you can avoid packing on some extra pounds even before the holiday season starts. Here are 10 expert tips to help you avoid the temptation of Halloween goodies, at home and at the office.

  1. Buy candy you don’t love. If the candy in your pantry is stuff kids like but that you don’t enjoy, it will be easier to resist opening those bags and diving in. For most of us, that means anything but chocolate. “Sour candy, gummy-textured [candies], hard candies and the others that are not chocolate are lower in fat and calories and typically not the candy we overeat,” says Sandon.
  2. Out of sight, out of mind. Ask your co-workers to keep their candy jars and bowls inside their desks or stashed in a cabinet in the break room so you won’t be tempted every time you see it. If they want to keep candy on their desks, ask them to use a colored container with a lid so you can’t see inside.
  3. Savor one piece of your favorite candy a day. Decide what time of day you most relish the sweet stuff, and save your special treat for that time. Then sit back and slowly savor the taste sensation. “It is so easy to pop a piece of candy into your mouth mindlessly and not get the full enjoyment you would get if you saved it and ate it when you know you will enjoy it the most,” says Sandon. Indulge your sweet tooth on occasion, because denying yourself completely could lead to an all-out binge.
  4. Chew gum. Sugarless gum gives your mouth a burst of sweet sensation for very few calories. “Studies have shown that gum chewing can also help [you] relieve stress, mentally focus on tasks, satisfy a sweet tooth, overcome the urge to eat candy, and help manage hunger pangs to hold you over until your next meal,” says Sandon.
  5. Replace the candy with better choices. Make the see-food diet work in your favor by putting out a bowl of colorful fruit or veggies in place of the candy.
  6. Move the candy jar. Wansink and colleagues have done studies on how frequently people eat candy when it is within reach, out of sight, or requires them to get up to reach the jar. “If you have to get up to get a piece of candy, it is not always worth the effort, whereas when the candy is convenient, consumption is higher,” says Wansink.
  7. Count the empty wrappers. It’s so easy to pop fun-size candy bars into your mouth that you can lose track of how quickly the calories are adding up. “If you keep the wrappers on your desk, it will remind you of how many you ate and hopefully inspire you to exercise moderation and stop after one or two,” says Sandon.
  8. Take a walking break. Getting away from your desk for a breath of fresh air can invigorate you and help you get over the mid-morning or mid-afternoon slumps that are often mistaken for hunger. (Try listening to Fit Radio and our brand to Halloween station on the app!)
  9. Manage your hunger. Eat breakfast before coming to work and plan for a few healthy snacks along with a satisfying lunch. Your preplanned meals with keep you feeling satisfied and make you less likely to raid the candy bowl.
  10. Sip on a low-calorie beverage. Keep your hands and mouth busy by drinking a zero-calorie cup of hot tea (rich with disease-fighting antioxidants) or big glass of water. And light hot chocolate can satisfy your sweet tooth for few calories than most fun-size chocolate bars.


Read the original story at

Don’t forget to listen to our brand new Halloween station now live on the Fit Radio app!

6 Common Beginner Running Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

By Maire,

Girl Runner Rain

How difficult can running be? You just need to put on running shoes, clothes and then hit the road. But this seemingly simple exercise is more complicated than most people realize.

In fact, most beginners make mistakes that hinder them from seeing results or wanting to pursue the sport long-term—they only end up with injuries and frustrations. Today we’ll look into common running mistakes and how you can avoid them.


1. Inconsistency

Most runners begin with a lot of enthusiasm only to lose momentum after a few weeks. But you can’t lose weight or get fitter if you’re not consistent. You’ll always be starting over if you skip workouts for 2 or 3 weeks.

The fix: The most important thing is to have a routine. Write down the days you’ll run, the distance and duration. While it might not be possible to stick to the routine all the time, do your best to complete all the runs within the week.

2. Not doing strength training

Most beginners abandon all exercises and focus on running only. They don’t realize that running can increase risk of injury and weaken some bones and muscles if not combined with other exercises.

The fix: Combine running with strength training. Doing bodyweight exercises regularly will reduce risk of injuries and help increase muscle mass. Do simple exercises like squats, lunges and push ups once or twice a week.

3. Too intense at the start

Most beginners are eager to see results, so they run too fast or run long distances. Running a 5k after a few weeks of training is a mistake. It can lead to injuries or fatigue.

The fix: Don’t train as someone who has been doing this for years, start slow and work on building discipline and consistency. Then increase the pace and distance of your runs gradually.

4. Wearing the wrong shoes

Wearing the wrong shoes doesn’t just cause blisters – it can lead to knee, hip and ankle pain. Avoid wearing old shoes or shoes that aren’t fit for running.

The fix: Go to a running store and buy proper running shoes. You can even ask the salesperson to help you pick the best shoe. Avoid wearing old shoes because they lack proper cushioning and balance.

5. Landing on your heels

Landing on your heels increases risk of injury. This usually happens when runners make long strides.

The fix: You should always land mid-sole when running. Avoid making long strides that will force you to land on your heels.

6. Not drinking enough water

Most runners don’t drink water during runs to avoid side stitches. But this can cause dehydration and low performance.

The fix: Drink at least 2 glass of water an hour before you run and one glass right before you run. Feel free to carry a bottle of water if you’re going for a long run. And of course remember to hydrate after the run.


Which beginner mistake did you make?

Read the full article here.


Runners, don’t forget the importance of music! Fit Radio has found the key to the perfect running mix. Learn more about the new Fit Radio Running Feature here.

6 Mistakes Fitness Trainers See You Making at the Gym

By Maire,

Shot of a beautiful young woman exercising in the cityhttp://

Run smarter, avoid injury, burn more calories, and claim a bigger body payoff with this “aha!” advice from top fitness pros.

Maria Masters


Tips from trainers

Ever wish you could eavesdrop on the personal training session taking place across the weight room and snag some inside “gym-formation”? Then listen up: We asked five top-tier fitness experts what mistakes they see many of us making. It turns out, the adjustments they recommend are surprisingly easy. Adapt these simple improvements for a cranked-up calorie burn (no extra gym hours necessary) and pain-free workout—you’ll see results fast.


Fitness Trainer

You lean on the machine too much

Nope, not figuratively. If you’re literally resting on the handles while you pedal up a dust storm, your lower body isn’t working as hard as it could be—and that means fewer calories torched, says Michele Olson, PhD, professor of exercise physiology at Auburn University in Alabama. Plus, you won’t effectively engage your glutes and core.

Worse, you could be setting yourself up for injury, because the muscles and joints in your shoulders and neck are forced to support much more weight than usual. “When you lean on the machine, you’re transferring about 30% of your body weight to your arms, shoulders, and neck,” says Olson. “If you weigh 145 pounds, that’s nearly 50 pounds.” Touch bike or treadmill rails with your fingertips for balance, and actively pump your arms if you’re on an elliptical.

Fitness Gym Machine Mistakes

You’re breathing all wrong

“Most people’s breaths are too shallow, at rest and during a workout,” says Beth Jordan, a personal trainer and spokesperson for the American Council of Exercise (ACE). Deep breathing recruits more of the oxygen your muscles need to function efficiently while exercising. With shallow breathing, you’ll notice that your chest rises and falls; deep breathing moves your belly. The timing matters, too: Breathe out on the exertion part of the movement. The exhalation helps push, pull, or rotate the body. “People have a tendency to hold their breath at strenuous points,” notes Jordan. “This limits oxygen delivery to the brain and can cause dizziness or a spike in blood pressure.”

On a run? Exhale as your foot strikes the ground, not before. Your diaphragm relaxes when you breathe out, so your core isn’t as stable, says Jordan—and you don’t want to land at your body’s least stable moment. Change up which foot hits the ground as you exhale. Otherwise, “it’s like wearing a heavy backpack all the time on your left shoulder instead of equally across both shoulders,” explains Jordan.

Fitness Tips to Breathing

You shouldn’t “HIIT” it hard every day

HIIT (high-intensity interval training) melts lots of calories in a short amount of time. But like most wondrous things in life (Louboutin heels, ice cream), it’s better in moderation. HIIT requires powerful effort—think 8 or 9 on the exertion scale—leaving your muscles stressed afterward. Do HIIT days back-to-back and your muscles will remain in a broken-down state (and more susceptible to a longer-term injury). “Your muscles repair and strengthen during the hours after the workout,” says Cris Dobrosielski, a spokesperson for ACE. “You should wait about 48 hours before doing another HIIT session.”

HIIT Training

You’re only working your mirror muscles

Don’t neglect muscles like the erectors, which help lengthen the torso, and the rhomboids and external rotators of the shoulder. “Skip these and it’s only a matter of time before you get a back or shoulder injury,” warns Dobrosielski. Do “pulling” moves (like bent-over rows) at least as often as you do “pushing” ones (think chest presses), which target your front.

Also, add back extensions to your routine: Lie face facedown, arms by sides and slightly off the ground, palms up. Raise your trunk a few inches and rotate your palms to face down; pause, then slowly lower. Do two sets of 15 reps.

Fitness Gym Tips

That cardio rut is bad for your body

Spin may be your true love, but you should have mini-affairs with other heart-pounding fitness workouts. “Most of the cardio we do is only forward and backward,” explains Fantigrassi. “When muscles on one side of a joint are strong and the opposing muscles are weak, it can destabilize the join”—and lead to injury.

The fitness fix: Combine cardio workouts that put your body in different plans of motion; for example, jog for 10 minutes, row for 10 minutes, and then do a few minutes of plyometrics, like jump lunges. Mix it up and your joints will thank you.

Gym Cardio

You should baby your hip flexors

Sitting for long hours tightens your hip flexors (the muscles above your thighs that let your legs bend toward your body). The tension is a precursor to posture problems and an achy back, says Mike Fantigrassi, director of professional services at the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

Loosen your hips using this kneeling hip stretch: Kneel on left leg, with right leg bent at 90 degrees in front of you; place right hand on right hip and raise left arm (A). Contract glutes and shift forward, then rotate hips to the left until you feel a stretch in the front of pelvis (B). Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides.

Hip Flexors

There’s a reason why you’re not losing weight

Your boot-camp class won’t change the number on the scale if you’re committing these errors outside of your sweat sessions:

You think about burn only in the gym: “You get strong in the gym—but you get lean in life,” says celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak, who encourages his clients to wear pedometers and log more than 10,000 steps per day.

You aren’t food-focused: A recent study in Current Biology suggests there’s a limit to how many calories we burn through physical activity; after torching more than a moderate amount, our bodies make it hard to let precious energy go. The fix is in the kitchen: “To drop 1 to 2 pounds a week, cut about 2,000 calories weekly through diet and exercise,” says Jordan.

You’re not as active as you think: One study out of York University in Toronto found that even when people were told what “vigorous” exertion should feel like, they still underestimated how much effort a physical activity actually required. A heart-rate monitor can help give you a more realistic idea of your effort and burn.

How to Become a Morning Person and Fit In a Workout

By Maire,


24 Morning Workout Tips That Are Actually Helpful



We know not everyone is a morning person. (And even fewer of us are eager to wake up and hit the gym.) But getting up and moving can actually be an amazing way to start your day.

While the best time to exercise depends on your schedule and your body, the odds are in favor of morning workouts. Think about it: You won’t have to trudge to the gym after a long day of work, you may sleep better, and you’re more likely to actually get it done if you do it before other (sometimes more fun) options come up. (Who wants to say no to happy hour?!)

Sure, you may have heard the usual tips and tricks, but what hacks do people who consistently work out in the early a.m. use? We asked those who know best—a mix of people who train for a living, Greatist staffers, and you, our dear readers—to find out what gets them up and at ‘em at the crack of dawn.

From the Experts

1. Cool down to warm up.

“I ride a Citi Bike to the gym to teach—even in the winter. Those single-digit temperatures and bitter breeze smack me so hard in the face, I don’t even need a cup of coffee!” — Ryan Wilke, co-founder of Throwback Fitness

2. Set two alarms.

“The first one lets me know I have 15 more minutes to sleep, which makes me happy. Then I meditate for 10 minutes, drink an almond milk cappuccino, play music (pretty loud—sorry, neighbors!), and throw on a super-bright Nike outfit. Caffeine. Clear Head. Neon. I’m out the door and ready to take on the day.” — Holly Rilinger, Nike Master Trainer, Flywheel Master Instructor, and co-creator of BeachFIT

3. Pack accordingly and get in bed early.

“Every evening I check to see what the morning workout will be and prepare my bag accordingly (not every day is a jump rope day). On weekdays I’m in bed no later than 10:30 p.m., so my 6:30 a.m. alarm doesn’t feel quite so brutal. I’m ready and out the door within 10 minutes.” — Sandee Shin, CrossFit Virtuosity athlete

4. Flip a switch.

“Blinding light as soon as the alarm goes off always makes me realize I don’t want to go back to sleep. Then I turn on some tunes—on days I need extra help I’ll go for Drake or Nikki—and grab my first cup of coffee rather than the covers.” — Jessi Kneeland, personal trainer and creator of Remodel Fitness

5. Have a delicious breakfast ready and waiting.

“When I’m looking at another 5 a.m. wake up call, I’ll pre-order my favorite smoothie from my go-to smoothie shop to be delivered to the box early the next morning. Once I hit that send button, I know I have get up early—not just so I can eat it, but to make sure nobody else eats it (which, yes, has almost happened). I even label my alarm to say: ‘Get your damn Liquiteria.'” — Sarah Pope, assistant coach at Brick New York

Fit Radio Workout App

6. Keep the alarm away from your bed.

“In fact, I used to have an alarm clock that would purposely vibrate off my nightstand, then shake and roll all over the floor so I had to chase it to shut it off! For me, the hardest part is that initial physical act of getting my body out of bed. It’s all downhill from there!” —Brian Gallagher, co-founder of Throwback Fitness

7. Make it a habit.

“Life is about habits, both big and small. So to get to the bigger goal of working out in the morning, I stick to small habits along the way, like placing my alarm clock in my kitchen. As I brush my teeth, I ask myself: What will I gain from staying awake instead of going back to bed? The answer is always ‘a lot,’ because a couple extra hours of uninterrupted time is enormous, whether it’s spent at a desk or in the gym.” — Adam Griffin, founder of Bodeefit

8. Prep your clothes—and a playlist.

“The more I like my outfit, the more excited I am to put it on! Also, I always have an excellent playlist. For me, music dictates the way and the intensity in which I move.” — Bree Branker, Flywheel NYC instructor

(Find your perfect workout playlist at Fit Radio)


9. Wear red and grab a mint.

“Most of my workout clothes are red. The color’s known to increase excitement, energy levels, and circulation, and for me it really works to get me going. I also pop in a peppermint Altoid, which I’ve done ever since my collegiate track and field days. Peppermint can create alertness, which is something I need running through Central Park in the early a.m. The only thing that I haven’t mastered is remembering my keys, which sometimes makes my workouts a bit longer than originally planned.” — Jay Cardiello, celebrity trainer

10. Coffee = life.

“I drink as much coffee as I can (if they made coffee IV injections, I’d buy ‘em) to get my zombie-like body out the door before it knows what’s happening to it.” [Editor’s note: After all, we can have more caffeine than we thought!] — Alyx Brown, Chiropractic physician at Manhattan’s Urban Wellness Clinic

Check out the rest of the list here.

Tips for Running With Your Pet

By Maire,


With the weather cooling down for fall, there’s never been a better time to try out a new outdoor workout, like running outside! If you need a companion to keep you accountable, look no further than fido. With the right preparation and gear, dogs can make great running partners, not to mention it will benefit you both! If you’re both new to the sport, here are our tips to getting started.


Consult Your Doctor and Vet

Just like we suggest consulting a doctor before beginning any new exercise regimen, we also recommend talking to your pooch’s vet before taking him out on runs. Some breeds may not be able to handle the stress on their joints, and your vet is the best person to consult if your dog is in good enough shape to take on this new activity.


Invest in the Right Gear

Talk to your local pet store about the best running leash for your pet based on size, weight and strength. Also consider grabbing a couple of pet-friendly extras, like a collapsible water bowl and treat holder for keeping them focused on the trail.


Start Small

Building up stamina takes time, for humans and dogs! Be sure to start with a smaller goal, like taking long walks or alternating between jogging and walking at a steady pace. Finding your pace together is important for longevity and preventing long-term injuries in you both!


Practice, Practice, Practice

Consistency is key for your and your pup’s success. Make a calendar of when you anticipate to run with your dog, and keep to those commitments as if they were as serious as keeping plans with a friend– they’re counting on you!

Woman and dog running toward the sun on summer beach in a beautiful golden sunset. Sport girl and her pet training together.

For more tips on running with your dog, check out this piece for specific training tips to use during a run.

For the best Running playlists head to Fit Radio. Learn more about Fit Radio’s new Running feature for groundbreaking pace-matching technology here.

3 Ways to Boost Your Health This Fall

By Maire,

Boost Health This Fall

A Fall Wellness Routine To Boost Your Health

by: Dolores Baretta

The leaves are blowing in the wind. The sun is setting earlier, and the air has a certain crispness to it. The yang, or hot energy of summer has started to wane, and fall is in the air!

Fall is an important transitional time from summer, the most yang time of the year, to the densest yin season of winter. Everything starts to slow down and turn inward and descend. Nature is consolidating and disintegrating, returning to the soil so as to nourish the earth and allow it time to become fertile again. The yang energy of summer still hangs in the wind, though, as the harvest begins.

Get prepared

Foods now need to be eaten warm, cooking time is extended, and foods are prepared for the winter. Cooking methods include braising, pressure cooking, or slow-cooking, like for soups.

Vegetables and fruits are being picked and prepared for preserving to make your food last throughout the winter. Fall foods are warming and pungent. Vegetables like peppers, onions, cabbage, and tomatoes are prepared to be bottled.

Herbs can also be dried, like dill, parsley, and rosemary. Fruits that are ripe in autumn are apples, pears, and figs while vegetables like parsnip, Brussels sprouts, pumpkin, and winter squash also come into season.

The organs of the fall season in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) are the lungs and large intestine. You can nourish the lungs and large intestine by including mushroom, garlic, sweet potato, ginger, onion, cabbage, pears, walnuts, leeks, radish, miso, soybeans, cinnamon, celery, mustard greens, apricot, apples, grapes, coriander, turnip, taro, Brussels sprouts and grains like quinoa, rice, and oats into your diet.
If you take a look at the nature of the foods that support the lungs, you find that they are a mix of sweet and pungent. While the sweet nourishes, the lungs need pungent foods so as to ensure that chi (energy) and blood are circulating, and therefore the energy doesn’t stagnate and produce phlegm.

It’s important to remember while the lungs take in the new (fresh air), the large intestine is responsible for eliminating and releasing waste. This is best done by drinking adequate water and adding foods that lubricate.

Get organized

The element for fall in TCM is metal. As metal is associated with organization, this is a good time to get your life in order and finish outstanding projects.

For those who find it difficult to let go, autumn can pose a problem, as this is a time to “release” the long summer days and outdoor living and move inward, becoming more mindful and reflective.

The summer furniture needs to be packed away. The house needs to be cleaned thoroughly, rid of dust mites, and rearranged for indoor living.

The lungs are the most vulnerable of the organs, as they are superficial and in the closest contact with the outside. The lungs control the Wei Qi, our protective barrier, which circulates on the exterior of the body, protecting us from external pathogens.

A weak Wei Qi allows viruses or bacteria to enter the body, giving us a cold or the flu, so nourish and protect your Wei Qi by dressing and eating warm and ensuring you’re sleeping in a clutter- and dust-free environment.

Get going

The emotion of the lungs is sadness and grief. Long reflective walks while breathing deep into your lungs will help to release any pressure you have weighing on your chest and give you time to reflect on the past events of summer while working through ways to deal with them.

The lungs are in control of warming the muscles and the skin and has an opening through the nose. Often when we are sad, breathing becomes very superficial and therefore the lungs do not get the air they need. This leads to a constrictive feeling some may feel when sad or grieving.

As the temperature cools, this is the perfect time to go out for a slow jog or a long hike, to breathe deeply into the lungs, so as to release the blocked energy and reoxygenate the body.

Fall requires good planning and motivation as you move into a new stage in your life. Don’t look sadly on the cold seasons. This is a time for you to look introspectively and take time for yourself.

Fit Radio Success Story – Meet Jennifer T.

By Maire,

Fit Radio Success Story

Meet Jennifer T.

Fit Radio is EXACTLY what I have been looking for. I love that I have the ability to let the app detect my pace for my “jogging” days and generate my BPM target rate to help me maintain my pace on “running” days. The controls are really intuitive and easy to set up by target pace and genre.

Fit Radio Success Story
I saw a Facebook Ad for Fit Radio. I just completed a great 10K race, but I was frustrated with the playlists I had cobbled together on Apple Music. Not being a big Trance or EDM music fan, I wasn’t crazy about the few 170 BPM running albums I found in my search either. In the past, I tried a couple different music apps that claimed to work with my playlists and music library, but they didn’t sync correctly with my Apple Music subscription and they didn’t offer their own mixes.


The ad for Fit Radio popped up in my feed and I figured, “It’s worth a shot,” but I never expected to be “wowed” by it. I’m so glad I clicked! The different genres make it so easy to quickly choose music that fits my mood. Being able to choose mixes based on my BPM helps me keep a steady running pace. I love the integrated timing, distance, and cadence features too. (Which also save me from draining battery life by opening other fitness apps.) I have a feeling my next races will have much better soundtracks!


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The Ultimate Guide to 10 Different Types of Yoga

By Maire,


How to find the best class for you.

by Jake Panasevich

When I first started yoga, I wanted a fast-paced, physical and sweaty flow class. After a few months, I tried other styles, but they were hit or miss. In one class I ended up in, for example, the teacher talked about philosophy and led us in chants for nearly half the time. I was confused, bored and in pain from sitting cross-legged. If that had been my first experience with yoga, I’m not sure I would have continued.

If you are looking to get into a yoga routine this fall, choosing from all the different styles can be overwhelming. Studios offer more variations of yoga than ever before, but don’t let all the trends and gimmicky classes distract you. Be clear about what your goals are before you choose your path. Once you know what you want, choose a program that fits you best. Here’s how:

Yoga for the Athlete

  • Flow: If you want to get in shape and tone up without bulking up, an exercise-heavy flow class is a good choice. When I first started yoga, I lost 40 pounds practicing heated power yoga or hot Vinyasa. These classes include plenty of lunges, core work and pushups, which are effective movements to build strength and burn calories fast. The temperature of a power yoga class is around 90 degrees, and you move very quickly through the poses. It is very fitting for those who want to sweat more and talk less about alignment and philosophy.
  • Fusion: Classes that blend yoga and exercise are popping up everywhere. CorePower Yoga, for instance, is a newer, popular branch of the standard power yoga class. CorePower offers heated flow classes as well as yoga with resistance and weights. The weights will help increase the intensity and help you get a more chiseled physique. However, the stakes are much higher if you misalign. Another fusion of fitness and yoga combines yoga and barre, which involves a workout using a ballet barre. All of these options are focused on physicality and moving quickly to get a workout.
  • Vinyasa: “Vinyasa” can mean many different things – so much so that it is difficult to tell exactly what you are signing up for when you attend a class. However, most Vinyasa classes move briskly in cadence with your breath. These classes are not heated, but that doesn’t mean you won’t get a good workout. While Vinyasa is fun and moving fluidly can be beneficial, these classes are not the best choice if you have an injury or joint pain.
  • Bikram: Bikram yoga is also a very intense method that builds focus. It is a very different physical challenge than Vinyasa. The yoga studio is heated to a sweltering 104 degrees and it is humidified to 40 percent so you break a sweat almost immediately. In Bikram, you practice 26 postures in 90 minutes, and hold the poses for a set amount of time. Bikram teachers repeat the same script each class, and it is the same sequence every time. If you enjoy the intensity of the heat and thrive with consistency, you will excel with Bikram yoga. If you enjoy variety, you should consider a different class.

Yoga for the Engineer

  • Alignment: If you have injuries or tend to be more tight and strong than flexible, an alignment-based class like align and flow, Iyengar or alignment-based Hatha is a good fit. The classes focus on subtleties where you learn by intellectualizing the biomechanical components of the practice. At some point, whether it is from getting hurt or just longing for more depth and knowledge about yoga and the poses, most people eventually seek out a slower, more thought-out, mechanical practice. Each class focuses on key alignment principles that provide insight on how to progress, and they are normally organized around a peak pose or a general focus. Additionally, alignment-based classes are great for beginners. You will move more methodically through poses and hold them longer than in a flow class. Pausing in a posture allows for more depth in a pose. This will provide a completely different challenge than moving at a quick pace.

Yoga for the Poet or Mystic

Yin and restorative yoga are perfect for those who love being still and who just need to stretch, restore and relax. In these classes, you will hold just a couple of positions for long periods of time. Exercise is involved in either style. Sequences are slow-moving and you use props to set up poses in a way that you can hold them for five to 10 minutes and attune them to your breath. If you are already on a grueling workout regimen, this type of yoga is a nice way to recover. By finding stillness in the poses, it becomes more of a meditative practice.

  • Restorative: Restorative is focused on alignment and positioning your body in a way that engages your muscles to protect your joints. This often requires props or using the support of the wall. For example, you may be asked to lie on your back with your legs up the wall for five minutes. This pose encourages students to attune to their breath and body.
  • Yin: Yin is slightly different from restorative yoga in the way instructors teach the poses. In this style class, you settle into the poses and stretch. There is less emphasis on engaging your muscles and, instead, you relax into each position.

Yoga for the Light-Hearted

If you are just looking to try something new and to not take yourself too seriously, there a couple options that are very playful and can be fun to try with a partner:

  • Aerial: If you’re feeling adventurous, you might try this style, in which the teacher helps you move through yoga poses while you are suspended in midair. I recommend trying a beginner’s class first and be willing to laugh at yourself when you fall and enjoy the anti-gravity effect.
  • Acro: Acro yoga normally involves coordination and time to build strength and to learn how to spot your partner. Usually, it takes some time for students to build self-awareness in their own bodies before trying these classes.
  • Partner: Practicing with a friend is helpful to go deeper into your poses. Events are also a fun way to make friends and try a class with a twist. Workshops range from music-themed classes – think metal music paired with Vinyasa – to yoga followed by beer tasting.


Find your flow and check out the latest Fit Radio Yoga mixes on our Yoga Station!

15 Best Superfoods for Fall

By Maire,

Fall Superfoods

These amazing seasonal foods are the perfect excuse to visit your local farmers market.

Fall superfoods

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!



Sweet or tart, apples are satisfying eaten raw or baked into a delicious dish. Just be sure to eat the skin—it contains hearty-healthy flavonoids. Health benefits include:

• Full of antioxidants
• 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving

Harvest season: August-November

Brussels sprouts

Made the correct way, these veggies taste divine. They have a mild, somewhat bitter taste, so combine them with tangy or savory sauces, like balsamic vinegar. Health benefits include:

• 1/2 cup contains more than your DRI of vitamin K
• Very good source of folate
• Good source of iron

Harvest season: September–March


Though these veggies may resemble carrots, they have a lighter color and sweeter, almost nutty flavor. Use them to flavor rice and potatoes or puree them into soups and sauces. Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• Good source of fiber

Harvest season: October–April



The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out their fabulous flavor, so try them baked or poached. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C and copper
• 4 grams of fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–February


A cross between a turnip and a cabbage, rutabagas are a popular Swedish dish. To utilize their earthy flavor, add them to casseroles, puree them with turnips and carrots to make a sweet soup, or roast them with ginger, honey, or lemon. Health benefits include:

• Good source of fiber
• Good source of vitamin C

Harvest season: October–April


The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of cauliflower is perfect for winter side dishes. It’s wonderful steamed, but it can also be blended to create a mashed potato-like texture or pureed into soup. Health benefits include:

• Compounds that may help to prevent cancer
• Phytonutrients may lower cholesterol” “Excellent source of vitamin C

Harvest season: September–June


Unlike summer squash, winter squash has a fine texture and a slightly sweet flavor. Because of its thick skin, it can be stored for months. It tastes best with other fall flavorings, like cinnamon and ginger. Health benefits include:

• Contains omega-3 fatty acids
• Excellent source of vitamin A

Harvest season: October–February


A type of winter squash, pumpkin can be used for much more than jack-o’-lanterns. Its sweet taste and moist texture make it ideal for pies, cakes, and even pudding! Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• More than 20% of your DRI of fiber
• Good source of B vitamins

Harvest season: October–February


Sweet potatoes

These veggies are for much more than Thanksgiving casseroles. More nutritionally dense than their white-potato counterparts, try roasting them—they’ll taste delicious, and you may maintain more vitamins than boiling. Health benefits include:

• Excellent source of vitamin A
• Good source of iron
• Anti-inflammatory benefits

Harvest season: September–December


Tender and mild, these root vegetables are a great alternative to radishes and cabbage. To flavor these veggies, use fennel, bread crumbs, or even brown sugar. Turnip leaves, which taste like mustard leaves, are easy to cook and dense in nutrients. Health benefits include:

• The roots are a good source of vitamin C
• Turnip leaves are an excellent source of vitamins A, K, and folate

Harvest season: September–April

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