8 Fall Tips for Healthy Living

By Maire,


There’s no need to pack on pounds or fall ill this autumn.

A nip is in the air, as summer eases into the fall season. Football season starts, and so does school. The holidays are right around the corner. So is the flu season. To help keep you healthy over the next few months, we’ve got these tips:

1. Take a Tailgate Time-out

It’s an all-American past-time — the tailgate party! Tailgating today has progressed far beyond burgers and chips. You’ll find everything from cheese dip to spicy chicken wings.

Don’t despair: Your tailgate spread doesn’t have to sideline your weight loss plan. Grilled kabobs are great fare on the field. Just skewer veggies, fruits, and lean meat, and soak in your favorite marinade. Seafood, salsas, wraps, and stews are good eating, too. A Crock-Pot of chili — loaded with high-fiber, high-protein beans — is a classic tailgate dish (don’t forget the Beano).

Just remember, alcohol is packed with calories. Enjoy your favorite brew, but switch it out for zero-calorie beverages as the party rolls along. It’s all in how you play the game!

2. Sleep Tips to Help Kids’ Weight

Does your child get enough sleep? If not, it could affect more than sleepiness at school. Studies suggest there may be a link between skimping on sleep and being healthy and overweight. Sleep shortfalls may increase hunger hormones — so kids eat more. Also, kids are less likely to get exercise (and burn off calories) when they’re tired.

To help kids and teens get a good night’s sleep:

  • Remove TVs, computers, and gadgets from kids’ bedrooms.
  • Avoid large meals before bedtime.
  • Develop a regular bedtime routine.
  • Set firm bedtimes and wake times.
  • Make sure the bedroom is quiet, dark, relaxing — and not too hot or cold.
  • Help kids quiet down a few hours before bedtime.
  • Heavy studying, text messaging, or video games should end in early evening.

How much sleep do schoolkids need? It depends on the child. But here are some general guidelines from the National Sleep Foundation:

  • Ages 3-5: 11-13 hours
  • Ages 5-12: 10-11 hours
  • Ages 11-17: 9.5-9.25 hours

3. Quit Smoking: You Won’t Gain Weight

If you’ve finally decided to kick the habit, there’s good news: Quitting smoking won’t make you gain weight over the long term. Some people pick up 4 or 5 pounds early on, but that’s only temporary.

To quit successfully, experts agree, get help and support from your doctor, family, friends, and co-workers. A doctor or mental health professional can help you tailor an approach that best suits you. There are many FDA-approved medications to help people quit smoking.

Combine medication with other quit strategies — like avoiding your smoking triggers or changing your daily routine — and you greatly increase your odds of quitting for good.

Another tip: Some foods and drinks make cigarettes taste better; some make them taste worse. Try eating more vegetables and less meat — and swap that coffee (or alcohol) for a glass of milk. Let your taste buds stifle those cravings!

4. Flu Vaccine? Who? You.

As temperatures get chillier and people spend more time indoors, flu season sneaks in. Because the flu virus can infect the lungs, it can cause a serious complication like pneumonia — which can require hospitalization, even lead to death. That’s why certain people must get a flu shot.

October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but you can still get vaccinated in December or later. Flu season can start as early as October and last as late as May.

If you live with or care for a child under 2 years old, you are in a priority group for flu shots.

There are two types of flu vaccines: flu shots and nasal sprays. The flu shot vaccine is recommended for:

  • Children aged 6 months to 19 years.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People age 50 and older.
  • People of any age with chronic medical conditions such as asthma.
  • People living in nursing homes or other long-term facilities.

Others who could get Flu Mist nasal spray include healthy people 2-49 years old who are not pregnant.

Also, protect yourself and your child from catching or spreading viruses:

  • Cover nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or cough. Throw it away afterward.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water — especially important after you cough or sneeze on them. Use an alcohol-based hand cleaner if necessary.
  • Keep you and your baby away from people who are coughing or sneezing.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth — since that’s how germs are spread

In 2009, the H1N1 swine flu, a new flu virus, emerged. This virus spreads from person to person like seasonal flu, mainly through coughing or sneezing or sometimes by touching something that became infected with the virus. A vaccine for swine flu is in production.

5. Holiday Game Plan: No Weight Gain

The challenges of holiday feasting are only too obvious — wonderful smells and fabulous tastes. We do love our comfort food! But the traditional holiday weight gain is another matter. If it’s a real problem for you, here’s good news. With a few simple changes, you can enjoy the feast without gaining the extra 1 to 3 pounds that tend to become permanent baggage.

Here’s your plan:

  • Don’t arrive starving. Eat something small and healthy, like oatmeal or a whole-grain sandwich, before the big meal. That will keep you full until dinner.
  • Exercise every day. This means big holidays, too. Get the family out with you. Start a new holiday tradition that involves activity.
  • Establish ground rules with yourself. Eat dessert, but only a sliver, for example.
  • Keep track. Write down everything you eat. If you put it in writing, you’re less tempted to overeat.
  • Eat smaller portions of high-calorie dishes. Enjoy, but don’t pig out.
  • Save calories for the foods you love. Don’t eat something just because it’s there.
  • Chat more, eat less. Shun those high-fat appetizers at holiday parties.
If you know you’ll have trouble resisting those favorite foods, plan for it. Cut back on eating early in the week. Get more exercise before and after the holidays. You can do this!

6. Sweet Potatoes: Winter Superfood

It’s one of the sweetest ways to make a healthful change — get hot about sweet potatoes. These luscious orange tubers boast a wealth ofantioxidants; phytochemicals including beta-carotene; vitamins C and E; folate; calcium; copper; iron; and potassium. The fiber in sweet potatoes promotes a healthy digestive tract, and the antioxidants may play a role in preventing heart disease and cancer.

The natural sweetness of a roasted sweet potato is delicious without any additional fats or flavor enhancers.

Sweet potato winter superfood

7. Exercise Your Brain: Go Dancing

You know your heart benefits from exercise. Your brain does, too. Studies show that regular, moderate exercise — 30 minutes of walking or a light one-mile run — helps fight the effects of aging on the brain. No grueling workouts required!

All types of exercise count, including walking, bicycling, hiking, swimmingaerobics, and weight training. Ballroom dancing is another good and healthy one, especially fun on chilly evenings.

How does exercise work to prevent mental decline? Researchers believe exercise may stimulate the body to fight stress that’s normally occurring in the brain — stress that causes oxidative damage. All that good stuff from a little exercise!

Plus, find your perfect playlist for any activity, workout, party and more on the Fit Radio app!

8. Curl Up With Hot Coffee

That wonderfully warming cup of morning coffee may have healthy benefits. The caffeine in coffee stimulates the brain and nervous system, and may lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, mood problems, headaches, and even cavities.

Scientists have discovered coffee’s many beneficial substances, including chlorogenic acid, a compound in the antioxidant family that may improve glucose (sugar) metabolism. Another perk is that coffee contains magnesium, a mineral that can also improve insulin sensitivity and enhance glucose tolerance — thumbs up for preventing diabetes.

Another plus is that coffee is naturally calorie-free. Just don’t load it up with extra calories from cream, sugar, whipped cream, and/or flavored syrup.

18 Exercise Moves to Tone Your Butt, Thighs, and Legs

By Maire,


Exercises that tighten and tone your legs from butt to ankles and everything in between

Rebecca Toback

Sexy, slim legs

Want mini-skirt worthy legs? These moves will get you there in no time at all. Pick a few moves, or try them all to sculpt your butt, hamstrings, quads, thighs, and calves.

Exercises for sexy, slim legs

Warrior III

This yoga move can tone your legs, and core too.

How to do it: Stand with the feet together, and lift up the left leg with a pointed toe, putting your body weight onto the standing, right leg. Continue to lift your leg and drop the head and torso so they form a straight horizontal line from head to toe with the arms at your sides. Engage your core and make sure the left thigh, hip, and toes are aligned. Remain facing down and keep your back as straight as possible. Ensure your right knee doesn’t lock and center the weight on the middle of the foot. Hold for 5 breaths and then slowly return to standing.

Switch legs and repeat.

Warrior 3

Chair Squat

This is a perfect move for beginners, and we’re betting you’re sitting on the only equipment you need as you read this. Hint: If you have a chair (and your glutes), you’re good to go.

How to do it: Begin standing with your back to a chair, feet hip-width apart. While keeping your weight centered on your heels, draw in your abs and hinge forward at the hips slowly lowering your butt toward the chair. Pause right before you would sit down and return to standing while keeping the core engaged.

Do 3 sets of 10-15 reps.

Chair Squat

Pivoting Curtsy Lunge

How to do it: Standing with feet hip-width apart, step your right foot diagonally behind you and into a 7 o’clock position. Bend both knees so you’re in a lunge stance. Lean your torso forward 30 degrees and pulse up and town 10-15 times. Straighten the body and pivot 180 degrees so your right foot comes to the front. Again, lower into a lunge.

Pulse up and down 10-15 times on each side to complete one set; do 3 sets.

Low Lunge Hover

This standing move exercises both the legs and butt.

How to do it: Stand with feet hip-width apart before stepping your right foot back, and lowering into lunge stance with the left knee over the ankle. Bring your arms over your head and hinge forward from the waist. Lower the chest forward toward the thighs as your arms reach forward. Lift the right leg while straightening the left. Hold for 3 breaths before returning to the starting lunge position.

Do 3 reps; switch legs and repeat.

Skater Lunge

This move exercises the quads, hamstrings, and glutes.

How to do it Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and the arms at your sides. Take a large step backwards with your left leg and cross it diagonally behind the right leg. Meanwhile, extend your right arm out to the side and swing the left arm across the hips. Hop about 2 feet to the left and come back to the beginning stance.

Repeat with the other leg; that’s one set. Do 3 sets of 20 reps.

The Lean

This move works the inner thighs and begins with the same stance as the skater’s lunge.

How to do it: Begin with feet shoulder-width apart and the arms down at your sides. Take a step diagonally back with the right foot. Then, bend sideways from the waist toward the side where your right leg is stretched out, and reach your right arm up and left arm down and back toward your right calf. Return arms to starting position to complete 1 rep.

Do 10 reps, then switch sides and repeat.

Leg Lift

This move targets the quads.

How to do it: While you stand facing a chair, raise your right leg, knee facing up, foot flexed and place your heel on the seat. Make sure not to lock your standing knee as you lift your right foot off the chair and straighten it out until you feel your quadriceps engage. Keeping your lifted leg in the air, bend the leg on the floor slightly and then straighten it again.

Do 10-15 reps, then switch sides and repeat for 1 full set; do 3 sets.

How-to video: Standing Glute Toner

Want a leg-lift exercise to work your glutes? Of course you do. Watch this video to find out how to do it right.

Watch the video: Standing Glute Toner Video  

Two-Thirds Jump Squat

Ready to work your quads and hamstrings? This move will really do the trick.

How to do it: Begin by standing with feet shoulder-width apart, arms at the sides. Lower the body into a squat, going two-thirds of the way down. Immediately jump straight up with your arms pointed up toward the ceiling. When you land, go right back into the next rep.

Do 3 sets of 20 reps each.

Check out the rest of the list here.


Find your perfect playlist for any workout at Fit Radio.

5 Ways to Hit the Fitness Reset Button This Fall

By Maire,

Fall Running

We’re more than halfway through 2016. How are your New Year’s resolutions shaping up? It’s never too late to re-start, and Fall is a perfect time. With school and a new season starting, it’s a great time to get your fitness goals back on track. Here are our tips for kick-starting a fresh fitness routine.

Fall Fitness Tips

Revisit Your Goals & What Didn’t Work Last Time

The best way to pave the way for success is to identify what bumps derailed you last time. Why were you unable to keep your last fitness goal? Was it too large? Did you not equip yourself with the tools you needed to succeed? Figure out what didn’t work last time and what you can do to right it moving forward. If your goal is to eat healthier, maybe you need to do a better job of pre-planning meals.

Fall Superfoods

Try New Tactics

Sometimes the approach is the reason for failure. For example, if your goal was to work out more often and you didn’t, were you setting unrealistic expectations? Were you approaching the goal the wrong way? If you want to exercise more and don’t like running, don’t try to become a marathon runner overnight. Try out different workouts to get your heart pumping, it just matters that you’re moving! (No matter the workout, find your perfect playlist on Fit Radio to set you up for success.)

Find a Partner

Were you trying to go at your fitness goals alone in January? Goals are much easier to attain in a group. Grab a workout buddy and hold each other accountable– you’ll be surprised at how much more driven you can become when you’re working as a team!


Respect the Process

Many people quit on their fitness goals because they don’t see results fast enough. It’s important to fall in love with the process and not perfection. Remember, reaching goals is more about the journey than the destination! If you learn to respect and enjoy the process and small wins, you’ll be more successful in the long-run.

Get Outside

As the weather changes, explore opportunities to change your workout too. Get outside and enjoy the crisp air on your next run or if your gym makes a change to its schedule seasonally, try taking your go-to workout class at a new time.

Fall Running

A new season is a great time to start a new fitness routine and hopefully, these ideas will help you get motivated to do just that. Embrace the change in seasons, weather, and your health habits. Soon enough, you’ll become healthier and happier for the new season ahead.


15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Best Tips For Getting In Shape

By Maire,


15 Former Couch Potatoes Share Their Best Tips For Getting In Shape –  – BuzzFeed

So you want to eat healthier and get in shape? That’s great! Learn from some people who’ve definitely been there.

Getting into shape and living a healthier lifestyle can be seriously daunting.

That’s why BuzzFeed Life reached out to people who’ve been there to ask them to share their advice. For one guy, that meant learning a way to trick himself into using the spin bike more often. For another woman, that meant transforming her eating and fitness habits, losing over 150 pounds, and getting her diabetes and blood pressure under control.

Whether you’re looking to make a big change in your life or a few small ones, you can probably use some of the tips these former couch potatoes shared. And if you’ve made a healthy living change in your own life, share it with everyone in the comments!

1. Make it easy for yourself to workout in the mornings.

“I never exercised. Very rarely. I knew I needed to because I needed the outlet for stress, and I wasn’t sleeping well. But I also didn’t want to exercise after work, because I’d always want to go out with friends, or come home and relax and just watch TV. So I knew I needed to try morning exercises if I was going to fit it into my day.

Here’s how I do it: When I get home from work I lay out my exercise clothes. I fill a bottle of water and put it in the fridge. I pack the outfit I’m going to wear to work the next day. I pack everything — makeup, shoes, outfit — have it all ready to go, and then set my alarm for the next morning. I do everything I need to do before I start to unwind. This forces me to just get up and do it, and not have to take the time to find everything or make excuses for why I can’t.”
—Cat Fuentes, 28

2. Master the art of portion control.


“It hasn’t happened overnight, but in the past seven years or so I’ve lost over 70 pounds. I’m about to run in the New York City Marathon on Sunday — it’ll be my second marathon. Back 70 pounds ago, I never could’ve dreamed that.

Tricks for myself, in terms of weight loss: Portion control is huge when you’re trying to lose weight. I’ve never been someone who wants to cut something out completely, so I had to figure out a way to allow myself little indulgences. I still go to restaurants, but now I’m all about tapas-style dining, which allows me to try a little of everything. It’s something I’ve gotten myself into that allows me to eat better without sacrificing my lifestyle.

Another tip: I snack throughout the day to keep up my energy, so I keep healthy things by my desk. My trick is making sure the snacks are in reasonable portion sizes, so I’m not just mindlessly munching on them all day.”
—Emily Abbate, 26

Emily Abbate is an editor at Fitbie, where she writes about health and fitness. She’s also been actively training for the 2014 New York City Marathon, and has beendocumenting her progress in a video series on Fitbie.

3. Get enough sleep.


“I had a breast reduction a couple months after I graduated high school, and then moved to Chicago to start college. Once I was out on my own, I had to learn to cook, which is typically healthier than dining out. And because of my class schedule, I had a lot of time on my hands to workout. Now that I no longer had HUGE BOOBS, working out was easier/more fun.

My number one tip for living healthier is to get enough sleep every night. You cannot eat healthy or stay motivated if you’re really tired. Sleep is legitimately the basis of all my healthy decisions. I just set a bedtime and stuck to it. Also, setting the alarm on your phone is really good for creating a new bedtime routine. Like if you need to be in bed sleeping at 11 p.m., set an alarm for 10:15 to remind you to like… stop checking Facebook and go wash your face. And sort of related: Unplug before bed. I put my phone in airplane mode to sleep better.”
—Rachel Miller, 29

4. Don’t aim for perfection.

“In 2007 I lost about 80 pounds, and then in 2012 gained most of it back. I wanted to get back in shape, so I decided to try running every day. And I was maybe running half a mile, maybe a mile at the most — I wasn’t good at it. I gave up about three times, saying, “It’s not working out, I’m not good at it,” and just went back to doing nothing.

I had a friend who lost 100 pounds running. And she helped to hold me accountable to get in shape. She would send me texts and Facebook messages saying, “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” That became my motto. Every time I didn’t want to get up: “You don’t have to be good at working out, you just have to do it.” So I started running every day.

I run probably three times a week now, I go to a simulated surfboard class three to four times a week, and I swim three to four times a week. And I’m so happy I do — I feel great.”
—Laura Prescott, 30

5. Find a workout you love — that way it doesn’t feel like a chore, and it’s something you’re excited to do.

“I was never active or in shape… at all. I had years of failed attempts at fitness that mostly included running on the treadmill and failing at the gym. After a doctor ordered me to quit drinking, I needed an outlet to keep me sober. I looked into hip-hop dancing but felt out of place and hated it.

I used to pass a Krav Maga school every day on the way to work. One day, I stopped in for a trial class and signed up for membership that day. Feeling empowered and excited, I went four times a week. I was hooked. Not long after I started, they invited me to join the instructor program. After weeks of grueling training, I completed it — an accomplishment my 220 pounds, 20-year-old self would never have imagined.”
—Ben Ronne, 34

6. Try to do some form of exercise for 30 minutes (or three miles) every day.


“I suffer from body dysmorphia, and consequently I really abused my body like crazy. Whether it was overeating, eating the wrong things, or eating to stuff my emotions down. I was also drinking a lot. Those habits didn’t go away when I became a trainer, and I felt like a humongous hypocrite. As time went on, I realized that I had a responsibility to my clients to walk the walk and talk the talk. I needed to make changes.

My big tip is consistency is key to getting in shape. The rule I set for myself (and that I set for my clients) is Thirty by Three: 30 minutes a day of some sort of exercise, whether that’s walking for 30 minutes, or five exercises that last about five minutes each with some breaks in between. OR you do three miles of something — three miles on a treadmill, elliptical, hiking. Sometimes an hour feels like just way too much, but 30 minutes always feels attainable.

For the past eight years, since I began focusing on my health, I’ve remained consistent — my body has stayed the same weight, I’m healthy, I’m a normal weight, I’m fit, and I’ve maintained it, and that’s what matters to me.”
—Kit Rich, 31

Kit Rich, an NASM certified personal trainer, is a Los Angeles-based celebrity pilates trainer. She’s been featured in Vogue, SHAPE, SELF, Women’s Health, Real Simple, US Weekly, and Pilates Style. She’s also made appearances on Access Hollywood, Access Hollywood LIVE!, E! News, E!Online, EXTRA, and The Today Show. She blogs regularly for

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When to Replace Your Running Shoes

By Maire,


3 Signs You Need a New Pair of Running Shoes

BY: Julia

The relationship you have with your running shoes isn’t meant to last forever. Here’s how to know when to buy a new pair to prevent injury and prolong an enjoyable running experience.

A comfortable and supportive pair of shoes are a runner’s best friend, but even the best aren’t built to last forever. Avid runners know working out in worn-out sneakers can cause unwanted running injuries like shin splints or runner’s knee. But how do you know it’s time to trash your sneaks and invest in a new set? Here, two running experts share the signs that cue a much-needed trip to your local shoe store.

You’re racking up miles

“As a rule it’s best to update your running shoes every 300 to 400 miles,” says Nikhil Jain, senior footwear product line manager at Brooks Running. Since wear and tear on the shoe itself isn’t always obvious, this method ensures you get new shoes before your worn ones cause pain or an injury.

You can easily track your runs with apps such as Strava, MapMyRun, or Wahoo, or with a fitness tracker. You could also opt for an old-school approach and hand write your runs in a journal. If you’re looking to eyeball your mileage based on time, take advice from a pro: New York City-based running coach John Henwood says he replaces his own shoes every two months.

You feel aches and pains

“As soon as one of my runners feels a shin splint, the first thing I do is ask them how long they’ve had their shoes for,” says Henwood. Knee pain and shin splints, which cause pain in the lower part of the leg, could both signal you need new shoes, especially if you haven’t changed up your running routine at all.

Not ready to part with your precious sneakers? Jain suggests keeping them around for leisurely walks or running errands. “While they may no longer be in good condition to run in, it’s likely that you won’t need as much cushion and support in your other activities,” he says.

Your shoes look shabby

According to Henwood, there are three areas on the shoe itself that signal it’s time for a replacement: the sole, the tread, and the exterior fabric.

“The cushioning in your shoe will be the first thing to break down because midsoles are designed to absorb shock and protect the body,” says Jain. “The tricky part is that this wear isn’t easily visible.” If the soles are shot, the shoe may appear lopsided from putting more pressure on one part of your foot than the others.

The tread of the shoe will be the next area to wear out, so if the bottom of the shoe appears flat and smooth, chances are your soles have lost their support and cushioning. Any holes that appear in the shoe’s exterior fabric provide a third red light that they’ve deteriorated.

To prevent your shoes from wearing out before you hit 300 to 400 miles, Henwood suggests using them exclusively for your runs. “If you’ve got running shoes, don’t walk around in them,” he says. “Have your running shoes for running and other shoes for walking because how you use them changes how they last.”

Jain also suggests rotating between two pairs of running shoes to prolong each pair’s life. “In addition, having more than one running shoe in your rotation helps you work a slightly different set of muscles in your feet, helping you strengthen them,” he says.

Fit Radio Success Story – Meet JT M.

By Maire,


I’m a physical educator/coach and I’ve been teaching Physical Education for 17 years in Texas. I was at a conference in early June and another teacher told me they had read about Fit Radio and it might be a good app for us to use and safe to play for the kids.

After my 3 hour trial ran out I was SUPER sad! When I figured out that Fit Radio was $28 for the year I decided it was worth the investment. I’ve had Spotify Premium before, but felt like it was a little expensive. I don’t normally buy a year’s subscription to anything yet alone pay for a music service, but Fit Radio was SO dramatically different than anything I had used before.

Since July, I have deleted Spotify and Pandora.

Maybe it’s my ADD, but I like Fit Radio–even just to enjoy music–not necessarily for working out, but all the time.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 11.55.56 AM

I plan tell our teachers about Fit Radio because it’s the perfect fit. You can safely play continuous music with clean lyrics without pauses or ads, you can start/stop whenever you want, and there are plenty of genres/mixes/etc. to choose from.

I also plan to use it for my after-school teacher workouts that I do for my staff members. I’m always genuinely excited to play Fit Radio during these classes because I know they will most likely ask what app I’m using. They agree, nothing is more annoying than using Spotify and having an ad interrupt a workout.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 11.57.24 AM

Every Summer I try to find a few new games/activities/strategies for my gym – this year Fit Radio is at the top of my list!
Music is HUGE in my gym/classroom so Fit Radio is something that I need everyday.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 11.54.14 AM

Do you love Fit Radio? Tell us about your experience for your chance to be featured! Click here to learn how.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: Treblemonsters

By Maire,


Our team had a chance to catch up with Fit Radio‘s, Treblemonsters last week. This is what they had to say:


Q: Of all your pet-peeves, which is the strangest?

A: Wasteful people. I.e. the ones at the gym that use about 4 towels per person or run through half of a paper towel roll to wipe something small down.


Q: What is your favorite animal? Why?

A: Cats. They are clean and do not need much attention. (Like everything else in this world.) Also, most cats have a spontaneous/random/energetic, but innocent personality.


Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?



Q: What would you do with one million dollars?

A: First, I would just cash it and pile it in my living room to stare at it for a small period of time. Then, invest most of it.


Q: Would you rather have money or love? Why?

A: LOVE. Because if we were able to materialize LOVE, than it would be worth much more than MONEY.


Q: Are you a good dancer?

A: Rusty now, but yes. I used to break-dance back in the day.


Q: What is the best feature about Fit Radio for our users?

A: It’s a mobile app. Anyone can access at anytime and anywhere.


Q: What are the perks being a Fit Radio DJ?

A: Other than a good resume builder and exposure, it challenges me as a DJ to come up with new and creative ways to supply high energy mixes in different genres. It steers me away from the generic and overplayed songs.


Learn more about Treblemonsters and listen to their latest Fit Radio mixes here.

Workout Tip: Fitness Experts Weigh In On Sports Drinks and Hydration

By Maire,


Do I Need Sports Drinks?

By Jen A. Miller
Author, “Running: A Love Story”

Do you need a fitness drink when you run? Or is water good enough? To answer these questions, Anahad O’Connor, a NY Times Well reporter, spoke with a few experts on the need for hydration during exercise. Here’s what he learned:

If you’re running for less than an hour, then water is just fine. But for longer sessions – or a marathon – you should consume some kind of carbohydrate-based sports drink, says Dr. Jordan Metzl, a marathoner, endurance athlete and sports medicine doctor at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

“After an hour you start depleting muscle glycogen stores to the point where it becomes difficult to keep the level of energy expenditure,” he says.

That being said, you should also be careful not to overdo it on sports drinks. A little goes a long way.

“If you just drink sports drinks, you’ll be taking in a lot of sugar and your stomach won’t be able to handle it, said Dr. Laura Goldberg, a sports medicine expert from The Cleveland Clinic.

Dr. Metzl said he prefers sports drinks with higher levels of sodium because they help to prevent muscle cramping, especially on hot and humid days. His go-to in that category is “Gatorade Endurance,” which has double the sodium (300 milligrams) and triple the potassium (140 milligrams) of original Gatorade. “I’m increasingly a fan of the double-sodium sports drinks,” Dr. Metzl said.

Be sure to stay hydrated on your runs this week. And there is some good news you should keep in mind as you head out for a run this month – training in the heat will help you perform better once it’s cooler.

Don’t forget to check out our top tips to stay cool during your Summer workout too.

Improve Your Fitness and Health in Just One Minute

By Maire,


Got a Minute? Let’s Work Out

According to a lovely new study, a single minute of intense exercise, embedded within an otherwise easy 10-minute workout, can improve fitness and health.

Just one minute.

This is good news for busy people who have tried, unsuccessfully, to fit even short workouts into their schedules. The overall time commitment for interval-training sessions is not quite as slight as many of us might wish. Consider, for instance, an interval session in which someone rides a stationary bike as hard as possible for 30 seconds, followed by four minutes or so of easy pedaling. If that person completes four of these intervals, with two or three minutes of warm-up and cool-down added at the beginning and end of the workout, the entire session lasts for almost 25 minutes, a time commitment that some people might consider unsustainable.

These concerns reached the laboratory of Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario. He and his colleagues have conducted many of the most influential recent studies of high-intensity interval training, and many of the scientists there regularly exercise with interval training.

They, too, had noticed that interval-training sessions were not quite as truncated as some people hoped and had begun to wonder if it might be possible to lower the overall time commitment.

But if so, they wondered, how low could someone go in terms of time and still gain health and fitness benefits?

To find out, the McMaster researchers recruited a group of 14 sedentary and overweight but otherwise healthy men and women. They focused on these volunteers, because sedentary, overweight people often are on the cusp of serious health issues such as diabetes, which might be kept at bay with exercise, but sedentary people also often cite a lack of time as their reason for not exercising.

They invited the volunteers to the lab, where researchers took muscle biopsies and measured their aerobic endurance, blood pressures and blood sugar levels.

Then they asked the volunteers to complete a truly time-efficient, interval-training program using computerized stationary bicycles. Each session consisted of three 20-second “all-out” intervals, during which riders pushed the pedals absolutely as hard as they could manage, followed by two minutes of slow, easy pedaling. The riders also warmed up for two minutes and cooled down for three, for a grand total of 10 minutes of total exercise time, with one minute of that being the intense interval training.

The volunteers completed three of these sessions per week, leading to 30 minutes of weekly exercise, for six weeks.

Then they returned to the lab to be retested.

Their bodies were, it turned out, quite different now. The men and women had increased their endurance capacity by an average of 12 percent, a significant improvement. They also, as a group, had healthier blood pressures and higher levels within their muscles of certain biochemical substances that increase the number and activity of mitochondria. Mitochondria are the energy powerhouses of cells, so more mitochondria mean better endurance and fitness.

Interestingly, the male volunteers also had significantly improved their blood-sugar control, but the female volunteers had not. The researchers suspect that fundamental differences in how the genders burn sugar or fat to fuel exercise might affect how each responds to some aspects of interval training. But more research is needed with both men and women before scientists will be able to understand the import of this difference, Dr. Gibala said.

In the meantime, the message from the study that most of us will grasp at is, of course, that one minute of exercise is all you need. But Dr. Gibala would like people to remember that 10 minutes of overall exercise time is involved for a total of 30 minutes per week.

He also suspects that, with this study, scientists are plumbing the lowest limits of worthwhile exercise time. “We’ve dropped from 30-second all-out intervals to 20-second intervals,” he said, “because for many people those last 10 seconds were excruciating.” Most of us, however, can complete 20-second all-out efforts without wishing to cry, he said.

Halving the intervals again, however, to 10-second efforts, probably would mot provide the same benefits, Dr. Gibala said, although “maybe if you did more of them, it might work.” He and his colleagues are studying these and other questions related to interval training.

For now, relying on one minute of hard exercise to ease you through the holidays with your health intact seems feasible, he said. And the exercise does not need to be cycling. Sprint up stairs in 20-second bursts, he said, or even run hard in place. The point is that time constraints shouldn’t keep anyone from exercise. In the time it took to read this column, you could be done with your workout.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: DJ Spryte

By Maire,


This week we had a chance to sit down wth Fit Radio DJ, DJ Spryte. This is what he had to say:


Q: Who do you think should run for president in two years?

A: Daenerys Targaryen. (Yep I went there!)


Q: How many push up’s you can do?

A: In a row, I would say about 45. Then, I would fall over.


Q: Would you eat a bowl of crickets for $100,000?

A: Are we talking live crickets? Would some kind of seasoning salt be permitted? (Either way, I’d still most likely do it!)


Q: What are your top 3 gigs you have ever DJed?

A: This is a though one. Actually, I think Fit Radio has worked with them. I did a Night Nation Run Festival in Los Angles last year with 15,000 people. That would definitely be one of my favorite shows. The other 2 would have to be when I played in South Korea at Club Answer and I love Canada so I would say the shows I’ve done up in Grande Prairie, Alberta.


Q: What did you think the 1st time you played the Fit Radio App?

A: Great App! People needed something like this. Especially for running, gym sessions, or even road trips.


Q: How does Fit Radio help people’s workouts?

A: Music has a tremendous effect on the way you feel. The right mix can motivate you to go the extra mile or keep pushing through your workout when you feel like quitting.


Q: What is the best feature on Fit Radio?

A: The Selection of mixes available. Plus having them all categorized really helps you navigate to exactly the style of music you’re looking for.


Q: How do you prepare a mix for Fit Radio?

A: I really like finding different and new styles of music and mixing them together with familiar elements of songs that are more recognizable to people. It’s a great way to introduce new music to the listener. When I start making the mix, I try to pair up vocals from hit records with newer, more abstract tracks. I think of a mix as a whole piece of music, as opposed to a collection of songs. So, it’s very common to always hear something going on, even in the spaces between tracks.


Learn more about DJ Spryte and listen to his latest mixes here.