Heal Better: Smart Workout Pain Solutions

By Maire,


A real pain in the butt (hamstring, ankle, or shoulder) doesn’t have to put your workout routine on ice. Here are smarter ways to ease the aches.

By Richard Laliberte

How to Overcome Workout Pains and Injuries

Early last year Megan Brady, 36, signed up for a half-marathon near her town of Waterloo, Iowa, and launched herself into a workout training program. But during a six-mile run five weeks before the big race, she had an uh-oh moment. “My right hamstring suddenly felt tight and started cramping,” says Megan, who put on her game face and kept running. She hoped the pain would go away once she got home, but no such luck. Her leg ached for weeks. “Whenever I stood up, I’d have to limp because I was so sore,” she says. “When I’d start running, the pain would get really intense.”

Megan, an athletic trainer at a local university, knew what the problem was: tendinitis, an overuse injury that would heal only if she rested her muscles for at least a month. “I didn’t have time for that,” she says. “I was determined to do the half-marathon.” On race day she achieved her goal pace of 10-minute miles, “but I was really sore for four days,” she says. “It was three months before my hamstring finally felt normal again.”

Mental Coping Strategies

We’ve all sucked it up and pushed ourselves through pain to finish a workout. Every year 42 percent of exercisers hurt themselves, a recent study by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) found. Knee pain and sprains as well as strains of the shoulders and upper arms are especially common; they help fuel more than $2 billion in annual sales of over-the-counter pain relievers. “When people begin exercising or try something new, they tend to overdo it, leading to poor technique,” says Windee Weiss, PhD, associate professor in the school of health, physical education, and leisure services at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. “As a result, they get muscle strains or soreness so severe that it hurts to move.”

How you react to that pain can affect how intensely you feel it, how long it lasts, and even how well you recover from the injury, new research shows. Typically, whenever you sprain a muscle, fracture a bone, or tear a ligament, pain impulses travel through a network of nerves to the spinal cord, which funnels them to the brain. But because pain signals share some pathways with thinking and emotions, those wires can become crossed, experts say. “Stress and anxiety in particular lower your threshold, so minor pain feels more intense than it normally would,” says Robert Gatchel, PhD, distinguished professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. People who are overwhelmed are also more likely to put a worst-case spin on pain, playing a mental loop of negative thoughts like “I’ll never overcome this” or “I can’t stand having to deal with it.”

Such thinking can trigger a nasty downward spiral. Studies find that “catastrophizing” pain — imagining the worst and dwelling on it — boosts activity in areas of the brain that relate to pain, creating more distress and worse hurt. In fact, some doctors believe that dreading pain can be more disabling than pain itself. “There’s a self-fulfilling prophesy with pain,” Weiss says, and that’s especially true for exercisers. “You tend to focus on how pain will hinder your workout,” explains Maria Urso, PhD, a research physiologist at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Massachusetts. “You’ll make a bigger deal out of pain than someone who doesn’t work out regularly, because you’ve got more to lose.”

That’s what happened to Dawn Nida, a 36-year-old bioengineer and lifelong runner in Natick. When Achilles tendinitis recently kept her off roads and trails for a month, Dawn says, it was “the worst four weeks of my life. I’m known as a runner, and if I can’t do that, who am I?”

Mind Over Muscle

The good news is that you can learn to quash gloomy thoughts about pain and use your brainpower to feel better. To start, adopt the attitude that most physical aches are nonthreatening. You hurt less when you perceive pain as the body healing itself and getting stronger, research finds. When volunteers in a study at Stanford University thought about pain in a way that made it seem more benign, they were able to reduce it by up to 64 percent. “They came up with unique strategies to change the meaning of pain,” says study leader Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, chief of the pain management division at Stanford. “For example, to produce a cooling effect, one woman imagined little snowflakes landing on her aching shoulder.” Get the same result by picturing your cells making repairs, swell­ing going down, tissues building up, and pain going away. “For five minutes twice a day, close your eyes and visualize that process occurring,” Weiss says. “Along with rest and physical therapy, this can help in­crease the rate of healing.”

When pain strikes, think about your fitness regimen for the past week: Did you increase reps? Up your speed? Start a new workout? “If your activity changed, some pain or soreness will be normal,” Weiss says. Apply ice to the area and take ibuprofen: Over four to five days it produces an anti-inflammatory effect that can reduce swelling and allow tendons to move more freely. Have you been skimping on shut-eye? “When you’re tired, there’s a good chance you’re changing your gait or technique during exercise,” Weiss says. “Get more sleep and you should feel better in two to five days.”

If pain wakes you up at night, feels worse in the morning, prevents you from moving a joint through its full range of motion, or is present when you’re standing still, see your doctor. You may have tendinitis or a stress fracture. “Rest is the only thing that will cure overuse,” Weiss says. Go to the doc right away if you experience any sharp, piercing, shooting, radiating, burning, or searing pain, which may be a sign of nerve damage.

As you’re healing from an injury, don’t stop exercising (as long as your physician gives you the okay), but do rethink your workout. “If running hurts, you can get the same cardio benefits without all the pounding by swimming or doing the stairclimber instead,” Weiss says. Activity delivers oxygen and nutrients that aid your body in repairing itself. Plus, it improves your mood and helps you stay upbeat. And who knows? You just may discover a new exercise to add to your repertoire.

After being sidelined by a second foot injury, Dawn Nida finally began to focus on what she could do rather than on what she couldn’t. “I kept telling myself that not running for a month or two is worth it if it means I can keep running for the rest of my life,” she says. Dawn took up Spinning, yoga, swimming, and elliptical workouts instead. “I realized that these other activities made me more well-rounded,” she says. “Now that I’m healed, I still do them all, and it’s made me a much better runner. The injury really changed my way of thinking. I listen to my body more, and I’m stronger than ever.”

Smart Pain Solutions

Minor aches and ouches during your workout are typically nothing to sweat about. Here’s how to recover fast from the three most common kinds.

The pain: Sharp and sudden

What to do: Stop exercising immediately. Let loose with a few expletives if you’re so inclined: Research shows that swearing helps block pain. Then try gentle stretching. If it’s just a muscle spasm, that should help relieve the ache, says Weiss. “If stretching makes it worse, it’s likely that you have a strain. You’ll need to change your workout so it’s pain-free or stop exercising altogether. To treat your injury, apply ice for 20 minutes several times a day.”

The pain: A dull ache or cramp that hits as soon as you start your workout

What to do: Keep going for two to three minutes and it will probably subside. This kind of pain often occurs early during exercise while your body limbers up. If the ache continues for more than five minutes, stop and rest that specific joint or muscle until you can exercise without pain, says Urso. To prevent cramping next time, warm up for 10 minutes instead of five. If pain early in your workout persists for two weeks, see your doctor.

The pain: An overwhelming ache late in your routine

What to do: As your body struggles to get rid of the lactic acid and carbon monoxide that build up during exercise, physical exhaustion can make you hurt. Reduce your intensity or pace. “If you’re maxed out, you need to stop,” Weiss says. Next time try tanking up on coffee first. Women in a study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who consumed caffeine before a tough bout of cycling tolerated leg pain better than those who took a placebo. Caffeine blocks adenosine, a brain chemical that helps process pain.


Read the original story at Fitness Magazine.

6 Common Beginner Running Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

By Maire,

Girl Runner Rain

How difficult can running be? You just need to put on running shoes, clothes and then hit the road. But this seemingly simple exercise is more complicated than most people realize.

In fact, most beginners make mistakes that hinder them from seeing results or wanting to pursue the sport long-term—they only end up with injuries and frustrations. Today we’ll look into common running mistakes and how you can avoid them.


1. Inconsistency

Most runners begin with a lot of enthusiasm only to lose momentum after a few weeks. But you can’t lose weight or get fitter if you’re not consistent. You’ll always be starting over if you skip workouts for 2 or 3 weeks.

The fix: The most important thing is to have a routine. Write down the days you’ll run, the distance and duration. While it might not be possible to stick to the routine all the time, do your best to complete all the runs within the week.

2. Not doing strength training

Most beginners abandon all exercises and focus on running only. They don’t realize that running can increase risk of injury and weaken some bones and muscles if not combined with other exercises.

The fix: Combine running with strength training. Doing bodyweight exercises regularly will reduce risk of injuries and help increase muscle mass. Do simple exercises like squats, lunges and push ups once or twice a week.

3. Too intense at the start

Most beginners are eager to see results, so they run too fast or run long distances. Running a 5k after a few weeks of training is a mistake. It can lead to injuries or fatigue.

The fix: Don’t train as someone who has been doing this for years, start slow and work on building discipline and consistency. Then increase the pace and distance of your runs gradually.

4. Wearing the wrong shoes

Wearing the wrong shoes doesn’t just cause blisters – it can lead to knee, hip and ankle pain. Avoid wearing old shoes or shoes that aren’t fit for running.

The fix: Go to a running store and buy proper running shoes. You can even ask the salesperson to help you pick the best shoe. Avoid wearing old shoes because they lack proper cushioning and balance.

5. Landing on your heels

Landing on your heels increases risk of injury. This usually happens when runners make long strides.

The fix: You should always land mid-sole when running. Avoid making long strides that will force you to land on your heels.

6. Not drinking enough water

Most runners don’t drink water during runs to avoid side stitches. But this can cause dehydration and low performance.

The fix: Drink at least 2 glass of water an hour before you run and one glass right before you run. Feel free to carry a bottle of water if you’re going for a long run. And of course remember to hydrate after the run.


Which beginner mistake did you make?

Read the full article here.


Runners, don’t forget the importance of music! Fit Radio has found the key to the perfect running mix. Learn more about the new Fit Radio Running Feature here.

Fit Radio Success Story – Meet Jennifer T.

By Maire,

Fit Radio Success Story

Meet Jennifer T.

Fit Radio is EXACTLY what I have been looking for. I love that I have the ability to let the app detect my pace for my “jogging” days and generate my BPM target rate to help me maintain my pace on “running” days. The controls are really intuitive and easy to set up by target pace and genre.

Fit Radio Success Story
I saw a Facebook Ad for Fit Radio. I just completed a great 10K race, but I was frustrated with the playlists I had cobbled together on Apple Music. Not being a big Trance or EDM music fan, I wasn’t crazy about the few 170 BPM running albums I found in my search either. In the past, I tried a couple different music apps that claimed to work with my playlists and music library, but they didn’t sync correctly with my Apple Music subscription and they didn’t offer their own mixes.


The ad for Fit Radio popped up in my feed and I figured, “It’s worth a shot,” but I never expected to be “wowed” by it. I’m so glad I clicked! The different genres make it so easy to quickly choose music that fits my mood. Being able to choose mixes based on my BPM helps me keep a steady running pace. I love the integrated timing, distance, and cadence features too. (Which also save me from draining battery life by opening other fitness apps.) I have a feeling my next races will have much better soundtracks!


Do you love Fit Radio? Tell us about your experience for your chance to be featured! Click here to learn how.

A Beginner’s Guide to Getting in Shape

By Maire,


A Beginner’s Guide to Getting in Shape – by Steve –

You woke up today and looked in the mirror.

And you said to yourself, “Gosh darnit (or #$^@  $#@$@%), I’m going to get in shape!”

Just one problem – you don’t quite know HOW.

It’s okay; we’ve all been there.   This might be the first, tenth, or the fiftieth time you’ve tried to lose weight and get healthy.  Sure, things didn’t work last time, or the time before that, or even the time before that…”but things are going to be different THIS time,” right?

So you hop on the internet, search “how to lose weight,” and see 7.8 billion websites that promise you fast results with minimal effort.  You get overwhelmed, intimidated, and then go back to playing Modern Warfare 3 or Hello Kitty 2: Island Adventure.

Somehow, you stumbled across Nerd Fitness…which means there is hope for you yet 🙂

By the end of this article, you’re going to know exactly how to get in shape.

Get your act together

First and foremost, if you suck at life…it’s time to stop.

I know it.  You know it.  Even your mom knows it (she called me).

So let’s get started.  Think back to the last time(s) you tried to get in shape and lose weight.  How successful were you?  What made you fall off the wagon?  Congratulations, you already know what “get in shape” method doesn’t work for you.

They say the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.  Unless you’re insane, don’t try to get in shape the same way you did last time…it’ AIN’T gonna work!  If you counted calories, ran on a treadmill, did kickboxing, tried starving yourself, or whatever, and you’re not happy with the results, it’s time to try something new.

May I recommend the Nerd Fitness method of success: the Triforce of Winning!  Well, I just came up with that title, but now that’s what I’ll call it henceforth.  If you want to succeed at changing your life, you need three things:

  • Education: know HOW to get in shape
  • Inspiration: know WHY you’re getting in shape
  • Support: having others help you along the way to get in shape

If you can successfully combine these three crucial pieces, then you’lldefeat Ganon and save Hyrule have a fightin’ chance at getting in the best damn shape of your life.


1) If you made some New Year’s Resolutions for 2012, make sure they don’t suck.  Be incredibly specific with your goals so that you can actively plan what steps are needed to achieve those goals.  Alternatively, if you somebody that NEVER succeeds at your goals, instead try making a new habit every 30 days…put the focus on the habit and not the goal.

Whichever method you decide, it’s important to be deliberate in your actions:

  • If you are setting goals – be SUPER SPECIFIC, write them down, and plan them out.
  • If you are making new habits – add them to your calendar, set phone alarms or alerts, and do them EVERY DAY.
  • Understand that Rome wasn’t built in a day, and Optimus Prime didn’t transform in one move.  This is NOT a diet, or a quick fix, but a LIFESTYLE CHANGE.  Don’t expect overnight results, or abs in two weeks.  Slow, steady progress.

2) Identify your kryptonite.  If you tried to get in shape in the past and failed, it’s important to know WHY.  Did you get sick and give up after a few days?  Did you go on vacation and say “why bother?”  Maybe you just got bored?  If you sucked at getting in shape last time, educate yourself on the hurdles and kryptonite that made you suck, and work on either avoiding those pitfalls or develop methods to deal with them.

3) Clean up your diet.  Believe it or not, 80% of your success when it comes to getting healthy will depend on your diet – unless you are running marathons on a daily basis, you cannot outrun your fork, and you can’t out-train a bad diet.  I honestly cannot stress the importance of this enough.  Whether you want to count calories, cut out certain foods, or attempt a new diet all together, this is the most important step you can take:

Now, most people suck at eating better because they try to make TOO many changes at once, their stomach freaks out and they run back to their comfort foods.  My advice?  Pick one food change every few weeks, and stick with it.  Whether it’s eating less calories per day, drinking one less soda, eating more vegetables or cooking your own meal once a week…small changes can lead to big successes in the long run.

4) Find an activity that makes you happy, and do it all of the time.  Do you like to run?  Awesome, do that (just do it right).  Do you like to lift weights?  Awesome, make sure your workouts don’t suck.   Maybe you like yoga, or dodgeball, or Ultimate Frisbee, or rock climbing, or whatever!  If you tell me that “I don’t like to exercise,” then you just haven’t found the activity that makes you happy yet.

We’re genetically designed to be active.  If you don’t like to move, then it’s time to try new things until you find something that you DO like.  Sign up for a new class, join your company’s running club for a day, try out something in your basement or living room, just keep trying new stuff until you find something that you like.  And then do it as often as you can.

Remember, your diet is 80% of your success or failure.   Exercising regularly will help you build muscle, strengthen your heart, lose weight, increase your endurance, stamina, and/or flexibility.  On top of that, regular exercise keeps your mind thinking healthy, which in turn will keep your stomach thinking healthy, which will cause your mouth to want to continue eating healthy foods.  It’s the circle of life, sucka.

Now, if you want specific direction on weight lifting, weight loss, or running, I’ve offer a few premium resources on Nerd Fitness.  Yes, they cost money, but they work.  These guides have helped hundreds upon hundreds of NF readers transform their lives.  Each guide comes with specific workout plans depending on your fitness level, video demonstration of exercises, and more…they all come with 1-year, 100% money-back guarantees as well.

  • Rebel Fitness Guide: a fitness guide for beginners who want specific diet and exercise advice.
  • Rebel Strength Guide: a guide for people looking to build strength and muscle, either bulking up or slimming down
  • Rebel Running Guide: a guide for new runners who want to have fun while AVOIDING INJURY

If you want to buy more than one guide, email me for combo pricing.

If you’re more of a do-it-yourself kind of person, you can build your own workout, or get started with a free resource like my Angry Birds workout.  The important thing is to GET STARTED, and then try to get better each time.

5) Put it all together:  These are the steps you can take today:

  • Determine your goals or habits you want to establish.  Write them down and hang them up.
  • Determine why you sucked in the past and how you can avoid it in the future.
  • Start cleaning up your diet in whatever method works best for you.
  • Pick an activity that makes you happy, and do it.  A lot.


WHY do you want to get in shape?  What is your reason for wanting to do so? Do you want to get in shape to…

  • Impress a cute coworker?
  • Win a weight loss competition at work?
  • Eventually play with your newborn son?
  • Grow old with your significant other?
  • Prove everybody wrong who said “you can’t do it?”

Have a freaking reason, friend!  Write it down, hang it up in your bedroom, have a calendar alert pop up every day, whatever.  But keep that reason for wanting a better life at the front of your mind at all times.

Many people get inspired by reading success stories of folks like them.

Lucky for you, Fit Radio has plenty of them on our blog.


Last but not least, you need support.

Yes, I understand its kind of fun to be an army of one: the lone ranger trying to succeed against insurmountable odds….but it’s not necessary.

Once you decide to get in shape, want to know the best way to guarantee success?  Make it public.  Tell all of your friends, start a blog, and/or inform your co-workers and ask them to keep you accountable!  Unless you like being called a quitter, you’ll probably think twice about skipping out on your workouts.

Maybe your word isn’t your bond, and you need a different kind of motivation and support to succeed.  Try money.  My buddy Saint said he would pay his friends $500 if he didn’t get in absolutely incredible shape for his wedding six months down the road.  Saint didn’t have $500 to lose, so he decided instead to just get in great shape…and it worked.

Build your own Jedi Council – find people who are stronger than you and work out with them, or faster than you and run with them, or more educated than you and ask them questions.  These are people that you can turn to when you need advice or help.  If you don’t know anybody in real life, keep reading…

Find a workout buddy!  There are going to be days when you want to sleep in and skip your workout.  There will be afternoons following a crappy day of work where all you want to do is play Halo.  Find somebody who’s at a similar level of fitness as you, and work out with them!  He/she will push you on days when you’re dragging, and vice versa.  You can inspire and support each other, feed off of each other’s success, and offer up tough love when the complaining gets too much (and yes, there will be complaining).


Read more about how Fit Radio, the number 1 fitness music app, is designed to help keep you motivated and reach your fitness goals here.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: Treblemonsters

By Maire,


Our team had a chance to catch up with Fit Radio‘s, Treblemonsters last week. This is what they had to say:


Q: Of all your pet-peeves, which is the strangest?

A: Wasteful people. I.e. the ones at the gym that use about 4 towels per person or run through half of a paper towel roll to wipe something small down.


Q: What is your favorite animal? Why?

A: Cats. They are clean and do not need much attention. (Like everything else in this world.) Also, most cats have a spontaneous/random/energetic, but innocent personality.


Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?



Q: What would you do with one million dollars?

A: First, I would just cash it and pile it in my living room to stare at it for a small period of time. Then, invest most of it.


Q: Would you rather have money or love? Why?

A: LOVE. Because if we were able to materialize LOVE, than it would be worth much more than MONEY.


Q: Are you a good dancer?

A: Rusty now, but yes. I used to break-dance back in the day.


Q: What is the best feature about Fit Radio for our users?

A: It’s a mobile app. Anyone can access at anytime and anywhere.


Q: What are the perks being a Fit Radio DJ?

A: Other than a good resume builder and exposure, it challenges me as a DJ to come up with new and creative ways to supply high energy mixes in different genres. It steers me away from the generic and overplayed songs.


Learn more about Treblemonsters and listen to their latest Fit Radio mixes here.

Workout Tip: Fitness Experts Weigh In On Sports Drinks and Hydration

By Maire,


Do I Need Sports Drinks?

By Jen A. Miller
Author, “Running: A Love Story”

Do you need a fitness drink when you run? Or is water good enough? To answer these questions, Anahad O’Connor, a NY Times Well reporter, spoke with a few experts on the need for hydration during exercise. Here’s what he learned:

If you’re running for less than an hour, then water is just fine. But for longer sessions – or a marathon – you should consume some kind of carbohydrate-based sports drink, says Dr. Jordan Metzl, a marathoner, endurance athlete and sports medicine doctor at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

“After an hour you start depleting muscle glycogen stores to the point where it becomes difficult to keep the level of energy expenditure,” he says.

That being said, you should also be careful not to overdo it on sports drinks. A little goes a long way.

“If you just drink sports drinks, you’ll be taking in a lot of sugar and your stomach won’t be able to handle it, said Dr. Laura Goldberg, a sports medicine expert from The Cleveland Clinic.

Dr. Metzl said he prefers sports drinks with higher levels of sodium because they help to prevent muscle cramping, especially on hot and humid days. His go-to in that category is “Gatorade Endurance,” which has double the sodium (300 milligrams) and triple the potassium (140 milligrams) of original Gatorade. “I’m increasingly a fan of the double-sodium sports drinks,” Dr. Metzl said.

Be sure to stay hydrated on your runs this week. And there is some good news you should keep in mind as you head out for a run this month – training in the heat will help you perform better once it’s cooler.

Don’t forget to check out our top tips to stay cool during your Summer workout too.

Improve Your Fitness and Health in Just One Minute

By Maire,


Got a Minute? Let’s Work Out

According to a lovely new study, a single minute of intense exercise, embedded within an otherwise easy 10-minute workout, can improve fitness and health.

Just one minute.

This is good news for busy people who have tried, unsuccessfully, to fit even short workouts into their schedules. The overall time commitment for interval-training sessions is not quite as slight as many of us might wish. Consider, for instance, an interval session in which someone rides a stationary bike as hard as possible for 30 seconds, followed by four minutes or so of easy pedaling. If that person completes four of these intervals, with two or three minutes of warm-up and cool-down added at the beginning and end of the workout, the entire session lasts for almost 25 minutes, a time commitment that some people might consider unsustainable.

These concerns reached the laboratory of Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario. He and his colleagues have conducted many of the most influential recent studies of high-intensity interval training, and many of the scientists there regularly exercise with interval training.

They, too, had noticed that interval-training sessions were not quite as truncated as some people hoped and had begun to wonder if it might be possible to lower the overall time commitment.

But if so, they wondered, how low could someone go in terms of time and still gain health and fitness benefits?

To find out, the McMaster researchers recruited a group of 14 sedentary and overweight but otherwise healthy men and women. They focused on these volunteers, because sedentary, overweight people often are on the cusp of serious health issues such as diabetes, which might be kept at bay with exercise, but sedentary people also often cite a lack of time as their reason for not exercising.

They invited the volunteers to the lab, where researchers took muscle biopsies and measured their aerobic endurance, blood pressures and blood sugar levels.

Then they asked the volunteers to complete a truly time-efficient, interval-training program using computerized stationary bicycles. Each session consisted of three 20-second “all-out” intervals, during which riders pushed the pedals absolutely as hard as they could manage, followed by two minutes of slow, easy pedaling. The riders also warmed up for two minutes and cooled down for three, for a grand total of 10 minutes of total exercise time, with one minute of that being the intense interval training.

The volunteers completed three of these sessions per week, leading to 30 minutes of weekly exercise, for six weeks.

Then they returned to the lab to be retested.

Their bodies were, it turned out, quite different now. The men and women had increased their endurance capacity by an average of 12 percent, a significant improvement. They also, as a group, had healthier blood pressures and higher levels within their muscles of certain biochemical substances that increase the number and activity of mitochondria. Mitochondria are the energy powerhouses of cells, so more mitochondria mean better endurance and fitness.

Interestingly, the male volunteers also had significantly improved their blood-sugar control, but the female volunteers had not. The researchers suspect that fundamental differences in how the genders burn sugar or fat to fuel exercise might affect how each responds to some aspects of interval training. But more research is needed with both men and women before scientists will be able to understand the import of this difference, Dr. Gibala said.

In the meantime, the message from the study that most of us will grasp at is, of course, that one minute of exercise is all you need. But Dr. Gibala would like people to remember that 10 minutes of overall exercise time is involved for a total of 30 minutes per week.

He also suspects that, with this study, scientists are plumbing the lowest limits of worthwhile exercise time. “We’ve dropped from 30-second all-out intervals to 20-second intervals,” he said, “because for many people those last 10 seconds were excruciating.” Most of us, however, can complete 20-second all-out efforts without wishing to cry, he said.

Halving the intervals again, however, to 10-second efforts, probably would mot provide the same benefits, Dr. Gibala said, although “maybe if you did more of them, it might work.” He and his colleagues are studying these and other questions related to interval training.

For now, relying on one minute of hard exercise to ease you through the holidays with your health intact seems feasible, he said. And the exercise does not need to be cycling. Sprint up stairs in 20-second bursts, he said, or even run hard in place. The point is that time constraints shouldn’t keep anyone from exercise. In the time it took to read this column, you could be done with your workout.

Fit Radio DJ Spotlight: DJ Spryte

By Maire,


This week we had a chance to sit down wth Fit Radio DJ, DJ Spryte. This is what he had to say:


Q: Who do you think should run for president in two years?

A: Daenerys Targaryen. (Yep I went there!)


Q: How many push up’s you can do?

A: In a row, I would say about 45. Then, I would fall over.


Q: Would you eat a bowl of crickets for $100,000?

A: Are we talking live crickets? Would some kind of seasoning salt be permitted? (Either way, I’d still most likely do it!)


Q: What are your top 3 gigs you have ever DJed?

A: This is a though one. Actually, I think Fit Radio has worked with them. I did a Night Nation Run Festival in Los Angles last year with 15,000 people. That would definitely be one of my favorite shows. The other 2 would have to be when I played in South Korea at Club Answer and I love Canada so I would say the shows I’ve done up in Grande Prairie, Alberta.


Q: What did you think the 1st time you played the Fit Radio App?

A: Great App! People needed something like this. Especially for running, gym sessions, or even road trips.


Q: How does Fit Radio help people’s workouts?

A: Music has a tremendous effect on the way you feel. The right mix can motivate you to go the extra mile or keep pushing through your workout when you feel like quitting.


Q: What is the best feature on Fit Radio?

A: The Selection of mixes available. Plus having them all categorized really helps you navigate to exactly the style of music you’re looking for.


Q: How do you prepare a mix for Fit Radio?

A: I really like finding different and new styles of music and mixing them together with familiar elements of songs that are more recognizable to people. It’s a great way to introduce new music to the listener. When I start making the mix, I try to pair up vocals from hit records with newer, more abstract tracks. I think of a mix as a whole piece of music, as opposed to a collection of songs. So, it’s very common to always hear something going on, even in the spaces between tracks.


Learn more about DJ Spryte and listen to his latest mixes here.

Has Fit Radio Helped You Reach Your Fitness Goals?

By Maire,

fitradiosuccessstorycollage (2)

Has Fit Radio helped you reach your fitness goals? We want to hear from you! (And congratulations by the way! 😉 ) Tell us about your experience for your chance to be featured in your own personal spotlight on our blog and social media! All you have to do is answer the questions below, email them to along with 1-3 of your best photos to accompany your feature.


  1. What has been your overall experience using Fit Radio?
  2. How did you hear about Fit Radio?
  3. How has Fit Radio helped you reach your fitness goals?
  4. What do you love most about Fit Radio?


Thank you all for your support of the #FitRadioLife! Keep it up!

Just go ahead and call me Guinea.

By superadmin,

Cari Seaman, Social Media

The premise of my blog posts will basically involve me morphing into a guinea pig and trying out any compelling articles that I come across while tweeting for FIT Radio. These articles feature fun undertakings, such as getting a workout while working at the office by sitting on an exercise ball (to improve posture and strengthen your back/core). This is exactly what I did for an entire week last week! I made notes throughout the process as to how I was adapting to my new fangled “office chair”, and (I have to admit) I am thrilled that the experience of the balance ball is no more.

Looking back at my notes from Monday, I thought it was going to be a piece of cake… maybe even a little fun. Psh! When I got to the office that morning, I pumped up the ball with excitement and looked forward to regaining the posture I had in the days I danced ballet. Dirk, our tech guy, was pretty jealous and kept trying to (unsuccessfully) steal my ball throughout the day.

Some notes I made included, “It might not be a good idea to cross your legs, Cari”. I also jotted down that my back muscles were definitely engaged after the first hour, and by the end of the day, I was convinced I was getting SOME kind of workout (my back was feeling pretty sore and as the hours passed, the harder it got)! The week went by just like the last couple hours of that first day, slowly. It worked my back from between the shoulder blades to all the way down my lower back. However, there were no feelings of soreness in the abdominal region (sad, I know). “TGIF!” We have a shorter workday on Fridays, so when 4:45 PM rolled around that day, I was pumped to trade in the ball for a chair with actual back and arm rests (you really don’t know how much you miss something until it’s gone).

Next time, I will just incorporate the balance ball every so often instead of multiple days in a row. I am happy to report my posture has improved! I sit up straighter at my desk and my posture is even better when I walk. Today, I finally let Dirk have the balance ball; he was already back in his chair after 2 hours! 😉 Ha!

Stay tuned for my next blog post and make sure to follow @FITRadio on twitter so you can give me ideas on what to try next! Also, please feel free to leave comments!! Actually, please DO! 😀