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Fit Radio Users – Meet Morgan B.

By Maire,

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Meet Morgan B. This is her Fit Radio Story:

 

My name is Morgan and I currently live in Colorado. For me, Colorado is the best place for anyone who is super active and loves the outdoors. Personally, my favorite activities include camping, hiking (Summer or Winter), and bike riding.

I love Fit Radio because it always keeps me motivated with the newest music and pushes me with every beat!

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Do you love Fit Radio? Tell us about your experience for your chance to be featured! Click here to learn how.

Pump Up The Jam – Positive Effects of Music on Exercise

By Maire,

The secret to scoring your best body ever is hiding in something you already carry around all day: your phone. “Workout music can increase endurance by at least 15 percent,” says Jacque Crockford, Exercise Physiologist/Education Specialist at ACE. With the Fit Radio app, you can enjoy hundreds of mixes from a variety of genres and stations curated specifically for you by professional DJs. Our motto has always been the same: Why spend time making playlists yourself when you can spend time sweating? Here are the top five reasons a killer curated workout playlist can change your workout forever:

1. Workout Music Helps You Keep Your Pace

For maximum benefit, your desired speed/heart rate should match up with each song’s beats per minute, or BPM. According to the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. “Synchronized music tends to drive exercise intensity.” Using your Fit Radio app, you have the ability to choose your workout music based on your desired BPM, or even your type of workout, and Fit Radio will deliver fresh new mixes that match your desired heart rate. Plus, through the new Running tab, Fit Radio will automatically detect your pace when you start running. From there, Fit Radio will take care of the rest and deliver the perfect running playlist that matches each footfall of your stride.

Music for your workout

2. Workout Music Increases Your Endurance

Remember those times you spent hours on the dance floor or jamming out all night at your favorite concert? You didn’t even notice because you got lost in the music! Music is proven to increase endurance because it serves as a (positive) distraction. When you turn on your Fit Radio app, our professionally engineered mixes are designed to not only keep you moving and motivated through your entire workout, but also having fun and getting lost in the beats. Your best workout always happens when it doesn’t seem like a workout.

Listening to Fit Radio

 

3. Workout Music Keeps You Focused

Everyone has that go-to song that always pumps them up no matter what. Believe it or not, there’s science as to why that happens. When you can associate songs with certain memories or tap into the emotions of the lyrics, it boosts the motivational power of a song. Each mix that is added to Fit Radio has been specially created by our professional Fit Radio DJs keeping the listeners in mind — thinking about what will help keep them motivated, excited, and wanting more.

Running with Music

4. Music Can Elevate Your Mood

To music lovers, this comes as no surprise, but scientists have recently found that people can boost their mood by simply listening to upbeat music. Not to mention, recent studies have also found that randomness in music increases dopamine levels in your brain. Not only does the Fit Radio app house hundred of mixes from the genres and artists that you love, they’re engineered re-mixes designed to give you non-stop music while also surprising you at every turn so you never know what’s next. (Talk about a win-win!)

Enjoying Workout Music

5. Music Makes You Move

Researchers found that when music possesses “high-groove” qualities, the brain gets excited and induces movement in the listener. With your Fit Radio app, turn on any mix and it has the ability to make you move — no matter how much you’re dreading your workout.

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Optimal Music for the Gym

By superadmin,

Researchers Say The Right Tempo Boosts Stamina, Energy Efficiency

Looking for a perfect tune for your workout?

Michael Jackson’s “Beat It” has the optimal beat. So does “Gangnam Style” by Psy and Lady Gaga’s “Edge of Glory.”

Research has found that at the right tempo, music can reduce the sense of exertion as well as boost motivation. Costas Karageorghis, deputy head of research at the School of Sport and Education at London’s Brunel University, says the “sweet spot” for workout music is between 125 and 140 beats per minute when people aren’t trying to time their movements to the music. Previously, experts believed that the faster a person exercises, the faster the music tempo should be.

Other new studies have shown that when athletes synchronize their movements to a musical beat, their bodies can handle more exertion: Treadmill walkers had greater stamina and cyclists required less oxygen uptake. And swimmers who listened to music during races finished faster than others who didn’t

“Music can alter emotional and physiological arousal much like a pharmacological stimulant or sedative,” says Dr. Karageorghis, who has worked as a consultant psychologist to music and sports-equipment companies and for Olympic athletes. “It has the capacity to stimulate people even before they go into the gym.”

The benefits of music seem most pronounced during low-to-moderate-intensity exercise—in other words, it’s more effective for recreational exercisers than elite athletes, scientists say. And finding just the right beat isn’t difficult, as a lot of popular music falls within the optimum tempo range and most other musical genres also have music in that range, Dr. Karageorghis says. For classical music buffs, two pieces that work for him are Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, known as the “Eroica” symphony, and Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 in G minor. Other qualities that make music ideal for workouts are motivational sounds and lyrics—think the theme from “Chariots of Fire” with its associated image of men running on the beach.

Sylwia Wiesenberg, owner of Tonique Fitness in New York City, says she keeps tempo in mind when compiling playlists for her two-hour cardio and body-sculpting class. “The hardest part of the class is the first 15 to 20 minutes,” she says. “I use music as my powerful instrument to push people harder,” she says. More