Category: Research


News

When to Replace Your Running Shoes

By Maire,

3 Signs You Need a New Pair of Running Shoes

BY: Julia NaftulinHealth.com

The relationship you have with your running shoes isn’t meant to last forever. Here’s how to know when to buy a new pair to prevent injury and prolong an enjoyable running experience.

A comfortable and supportive pair of shoes are a runner’s best friend, but even the best aren’t built to last forever. Avid runners know working out in worn-out sneakers can cause unwanted running injuries like shin splints or runner’s knee. But how do you know it’s time to trash your sneaks and invest in a new set? Here, two running experts share the signs that cue a much-needed trip to your local shoe store.

You’re racking up miles

“As a rule it’s best to update your running shoes every 300 to 400 miles,” says Nikhil Jain, senior footwear product line manager at Brooks Running. Since wear and tear on the shoe itself isn’t always obvious, this method ensures you get new shoes before your worn ones cause pain or an injury.

You can easily track your runs with apps such as Strava, MapMyRun, or Wahoo, or with a fitness tracker. You could also opt for an old-school approach and hand write your runs in a journal. If you’re looking to eyeball your mileage based on time, take advice from a pro: New York City-based running coach John Henwood says he replaces his own shoes every two months.

You feel aches and pains

“As soon as one of my runners feels a shin splint, the first thing I do is ask them how long they’ve had their shoes for,” says Henwood. Knee pain and shin splints, which cause pain in the lower part of the leg, could both signal you need new shoes, especially if you haven’t changed up your running routine at all.

Not ready to part with your precious sneakers? Jain suggests keeping them around for leisurely walks or running errands. “While they may no longer be in good condition to run in, it’s likely that you won’t need as much cushion and support in your other activities,” he says.

Your shoes look shabby

According to Henwood, there are three areas on the shoe itself that signal it’s time for a replacement: the sole, the tread, and the exterior fabric.

“The cushioning in your shoe will be the first thing to break down because midsoles are designed to absorb shock and protect the body,” says Jain. “The tricky part is that this wear isn’t easily visible.” If the soles are shot, the shoe may appear lopsided from putting more pressure on one part of your foot than the others.

The tread of the shoe will be the next area to wear out, so if the bottom of the shoe appears flat and smooth, chances are your soles have lost their support and cushioning. Any holes that appear in the shoe’s exterior fabric provide a third red light that they’ve deteriorated.

To prevent your shoes from wearing out before you hit 300 to 400 miles, Henwood suggests using them exclusively for your runs. “If you’ve got running shoes, don’t walk around in them,” he says. “Have your running shoes for running and other shoes for walking because how you use them changes how they last.”

Jain also suggests rotating between two pairs of running shoes to prolong each pair’s life. “In addition, having more than one running shoe in your rotation helps you work a slightly different set of muscles in your feet, helping you strengthen them,” he says.

How Fat Turns to Muscle Through Exercise

By Maire,

How Exercise Changes Fat and Muscle Cells

BY: Gretchen ReynoldsNY Times

Exercise promotes health, reducing most people’s risks of developing diabetes and growing obese. But just how, at a cellular level, exercise performs this beneficial magic — what physiological steps are involved and in what order — remains mysterious to a surprising degree.

Several striking new studies, however, provide some clarity by showing that exercise seems able to drastically alter how genes operate.

Genes are, of course, not static. They turn on or off, depending on what biochemical signals they receive from elsewhere in the body. When they are turned on, genes express various proteins that, in turn, prompt a range of physiological actions in the body.

One powerful means of affecting gene activity involves a process called methylation, in which methyl groups, a cluster of carbon and hydrogen atoms, attach to the outside of a gene and make it easier or harder for that gene to receive and respond to messages from the body. In this way, the behavior of the gene is changed, but not the fundamental structure of the gene itself. Remarkably, these methylation patterns can be passed on to offspring – a phenomenon known as epigenetics.

What is particularly fascinating about the methylation process is that it seems to be driven largely by how you live your life. Many recent studies have found that diet, for instance, notably affects the methylation of genes, and scientists working in this area suspect that differing genetic methylation patterns resulting from differing diets may partly determine whether someone develops diabetes and other metabolic diseases.

But the role of physical activity in gene methylation has been poorly understood, even though exercise, like diet, greatly changes the body. So several groups of scientists recently set out to determine what working out does to the exterior of our genes.

The answer, their recently published results show, is plenty.

Of the new studies, perhaps the most tantalizing, conducted principally by researchers affiliated with the Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden and published last month in PLoS One, began by recruiting several dozen sedentary but generally healthy adult Swedish men and sucking out some of their fat cells. Using recently developed molecular techniques, the researchers mapped the existing methylation patterns on the DNA within those cells. They also measured the men’s body composition, aerobic capacity, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and similar markers of health and fitness.

Then they asked the men to start working out. Under the guidance of a trainer, the volunteers began attending hourlong spinning or aerobics classes approximately twice a week for six months. By the end of that time, the men had shed fat and inches around their waists, increased their endurance and improved their blood pressure and cholesterol profiles.

Less obviously, but perhaps even more consequentially, they also had altered the methylation pattern of many of the genes in their fat cells. In fact, more than 17,900 individual locations on 7,663 separate genes in the fat cells now displayed changed methylation patterns. In most cases, the genes had become more methylated, but some had fewer methyl groups attached. Both situations affect how those genes express proteins.

The genes showing the greatest change in methylation also tended to be those that had been previously identified as playing some role in fat storage and the risk for developing diabetes or obesity.

“Our data suggest that exercise may affect the risk for Type 2 diabetes and obesity by changing DNA methylation of those genes,” says Charlotte Ling, an associate professor at Lund University and senior author of the study.

Meanwhile, other studies have found that exercise has an equally profound effect on DNA methylation within human muscle cells, even after a single workout.

To reach that conclusion, scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and other institutions took muscle biopsies from a group of sedentary men and women and mapped their muscle cells’ methylation patterns. They then had the volunteers ride stationary bicycles until they had burned about 400 calories. Some rode strenuously, others more easily.

Afterward, a second muscle biopsy showed that DNA methylation patterns in the muscle cells were already changing after that lone workout, with some genes gaining methyl groups and some losing them. Several of the genes most altered, as in the fat cell study, are known to produce proteins that affect the body’s metabolism, including the risk for diabetes and obesity.

Interestingly, the muscle cell methylation changes were far more pronounced among the volunteers who had ridden vigorously than in those who had pedaled more gently, even though their total energy output was the same.

The overarching implication of the study’s findings, says Juleen Zierath, a professor of integrative physiology at the Karolinska Institute and senior author of the study, is that DNA methylation changes are probably “one of the earliest adaptations to exercise” and drive the bodily changes that follow.

Of course, the intricacies of that bogglingly complex process have yet to be fully teased out. Scientists do not know, for instance, whether exercise-induced methylation changes linger if someone becomes sedentary, or if resistance training has similar effects on the behavior of genes. Nor is it known whether these changes might be passed on from one generation to the next. But already it is clear, Dr. Ling says, that these new findings “are additional proof of the robust effect exercise can have on the human body, even at the level of our DNA.”

10 Reasons Exercising on Vacation is Worth it

By Maire,

With the last days of summer upon us and the holiday season rapidly approaching, we want to know: Do I really have to workout when I’m on vacation?

It only took a little research to find a clear answer. While it might feel like vacation is the perfect excuse to hit the beach chair rather than the gym, there are actually a ton of benefits to working out on your time off. And best of all, it really doesn’t have to be hard. Here are 10 reasons why you shouldn’t “forget” your running shoes on your next trip.

 

1.It’s meditation in motion.

According to the Mayo Clinic, focusing on a single task, such as physical activity, can result in energy and optimism. It can calm you down and clear your mind. The Fit Radio yoga mixes can help you get in the zone for a relaxing yoga session.

corepoweryoga

 

2. It improves your mood.

Elle Woods said it first: “Exercise gives you endorphins and endorphins make you happy.” And isn’t the whole point of vacation to be happy?

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3. It’s a chance for extra alone time.

We’ve all wished for just five minutes of alone time on family vacation before. Going for a run, or even just a brisk walk, is a great way to enjoy some time to yourself. (Plus, have you tried our new Running Feature?)

StaffPicks-edit

 

4. Or, it can be a great family activity.

Maybe you just can’t get enough of your loved ones, in which case physical activity is a great way to bond. Plan a family tennis tournament or basketball game. Go for a hike or rent kayaks. No matter the activity, it’ll bring everyone closer together and get everyone’s heart rate up.

 

5. It’s a great way to sightsee.

If you’re in a beautiful location with a lot to see, don’t spend valuable sightseeing time on the treadmill! Run through a local park or on the beach or up a mountain. Use exercise as an opportunity to do things you might not otherwise, like hitting the other side of town or catching the sunrise.

Asian woman running on waterfront path

 

6. It doesn’t have to take long.

Strapped for time? Don’t stress yourself out by trying to fit in an hour-long workout. Exercise trends like HIIT and tabata training can be done in as little as seven minutes and there are plenty of Fit Radio mixes to keep you entertained.

 

7. It doesn’t have to involve any equipment.

Skip taking the elevator and put on Fit Radio’s Stair Climber station as you take the stairs to your room. Workout complete.

stair-climbing

 

8. It’ll get you outside in the fresh air.

Running outside is reportedly connected with “greater feelings of revitalization and positive engagement, decreases in tension, confusion, anger, and depression, and increased energy.” Plus weather conditions can be a bonus; wind resistance creates a tougher workout and sunny skies provide much needed Vitamin D.

 

9. It will help you sleep.

It’s much-cited fact that exercising can help you sleep better. Vacation workouts will help you not only catch up on sleep, but get better quality sleep.

 

10. It’s part of your routine.

Could you really go a week, or even a long weekend, without listening to your favorite Fit Radio DJs? We sure couldn’t.

Workout Tip: Fitness Experts Weigh In On Sports Drinks and Hydration

By Maire,

Do I Need Sports Drinks?

By Jen A. Miller
Author, “Running: A Love Story”

Do you need a fitness drink when you run? Or is water good enough? To answer these questions, Anahad O’Connor, a NY Times Well reporter, spoke with a few experts on the need for hydration during exercise. Here’s what he learned:

If you’re running for less than an hour, then water is just fine. But for longer sessions – or a marathon – you should consume some kind of carbohydrate-based sports drink, says Dr. Jordan Metzl, a marathoner, endurance athlete and sports medicine doctor at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

“After an hour you start depleting muscle glycogen stores to the point where it becomes difficult to keep the level of energy expenditure,” he says.

That being said, you should also be careful not to overdo it on sports drinks. A little goes a long way.

“If you just drink sports drinks, you’ll be taking in a lot of sugar and your stomach won’t be able to handle it, said Dr. Laura Goldberg, a sports medicine expert from The Cleveland Clinic.

Dr. Metzl said he prefers sports drinks with higher levels of sodium because they help to prevent muscle cramping, especially on hot and humid days. His go-to in that category is “Gatorade Endurance,” which has double the sodium (300 milligrams) and triple the potassium (140 milligrams) of original Gatorade. “I’m increasingly a fan of the double-sodium sports drinks,” Dr. Metzl said.

Be sure to stay hydrated on your runs this week. And there is some good news you should keep in mind as you head out for a run this month – training in the heat will help you perform better once it’s cooler.

Don’t forget to check out our top tips to stay cool during your Summer workout too.

Improve Your Fitness and Health in Just One Minute

By Maire,

Got a Minute? Let’s Work Out

According to a lovely new study, a single minute of intense exercise, embedded within an otherwise easy 10-minute workout, can improve fitness and health.

Just one minute.

This is good news for busy people who have tried, unsuccessfully, to fit even short workouts into their schedules. The overall time commitment for interval-training sessions is not quite as slight as many of us might wish. Consider, for instance, an interval session in which someone rides a stationary bike as hard as possible for 30 seconds, followed by four minutes or so of easy pedaling. If that person completes four of these intervals, with two or three minutes of warm-up and cool-down added at the beginning and end of the workout, the entire session lasts for almost 25 minutes, a time commitment that some people might consider unsustainable.

These concerns reached the laboratory of Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario. He and his colleagues have conducted many of the most influential recent studies of high-intensity interval training, and many of the scientists there regularly exercise with interval training.

They, too, had noticed that interval-training sessions were not quite as truncated as some people hoped and had begun to wonder if it might be possible to lower the overall time commitment.

But if so, they wondered, how low could someone go in terms of time and still gain health and fitness benefits?

To find out, the McMaster researchers recruited a group of 14 sedentary and overweight but otherwise healthy men and women. They focused on these volunteers, because sedentary, overweight people often are on the cusp of serious health issues such as diabetes, which might be kept at bay with exercise, but sedentary people also often cite a lack of time as their reason for not exercising.

They invited the volunteers to the lab, where researchers took muscle biopsies and measured their aerobic endurance, blood pressures and blood sugar levels.

Then they asked the volunteers to complete a truly time-efficient, interval-training program using computerized stationary bicycles. Each session consisted of three 20-second “all-out” intervals, during which riders pushed the pedals absolutely as hard as they could manage, followed by two minutes of slow, easy pedaling. The riders also warmed up for two minutes and cooled down for three, for a grand total of 10 minutes of total exercise time, with one minute of that being the intense interval training.

The volunteers completed three of these sessions per week, leading to 30 minutes of weekly exercise, for six weeks.

Then they returned to the lab to be retested.

Their bodies were, it turned out, quite different now. The men and women had increased their endurance capacity by an average of 12 percent, a significant improvement. They also, as a group, had healthier blood pressures and higher levels within their muscles of certain biochemical substances that increase the number and activity of mitochondria. Mitochondria are the energy powerhouses of cells, so more mitochondria mean better endurance and fitness.

Interestingly, the male volunteers also had significantly improved their blood-sugar control, but the female volunteers had not. The researchers suspect that fundamental differences in how the genders burn sugar or fat to fuel exercise might affect how each responds to some aspects of interval training. But more research is needed with both men and women before scientists will be able to understand the import of this difference, Dr. Gibala said.

In the meantime, the message from the study that most of us will grasp at is, of course, that one minute of exercise is all you need. But Dr. Gibala would like people to remember that 10 minutes of overall exercise time is involved for a total of 30 minutes per week.

He also suspects that, with this study, scientists are plumbing the lowest limits of worthwhile exercise time. “We’ve dropped from 30-second all-out intervals to 20-second intervals,” he said, “because for many people those last 10 seconds were excruciating.” Most of us, however, can complete 20-second all-out efforts without wishing to cry, he said.

Halving the intervals again, however, to 10-second efforts, probably would mot provide the same benefits, Dr. Gibala said, although “maybe if you did more of them, it might work.” He and his colleagues are studying these and other questions related to interval training.

For now, relying on one minute of hard exercise to ease you through the holidays with your health intact seems feasible, he said. And the exercise does not need to be cycling. Sprint up stairs in 20-second bursts, he said, or even run hard in place. The point is that time constraints shouldn’t keep anyone from exercise. In the time it took to read this column, you could be done with your workout.

Beat the Heat – 6 Tips for Exercising in the Summertime

By Maire,

When Summer hits and warm temperatures rise, just thinking about heading out for a workout can be draining. However, it’s actually not all in your head — working up a sweat during the serious summer heat puts a lot of added stress on your body. Mayo Clinic explained that hot weather leads to a more dramatic increase in body temperature. Therefore, your body sends more blood to circulate through the skin as a way to cool off, but, at the same time, increases your heart rate. The humidity makes high temperatures even worse, because it prevents sweat from evaporating off of your skin.

We all know the heat can make you feel bogged down, but it can also be harmful if you aren’t careful. The most important thing to remember above all else is staying hydrated. According to Livestrong, adequate hydration not only aids in maintaining your fluid levels, but also helps to cool your core temperature. When the temperatures soar, these six tips will help you keep your cool so you don’t have to miss a workout.

 

  1. Invest in a water bottle

Carrying water with you is an absolute necessity if you’re exercising outside. There might be a drinking fountain or two nearby, but you’re going to need more than a few sips to keep yourself cool. Classic plastic models aren’t always the best choices either. Even if your water might be chilly when you leave the house, the extreme heat will go to work on the liquid pretty fast. It’s a good thing that today, there are a multitude of water bottle brands that are designed to keep your beverage cold much longer than a plain, plastic bottle.

  1. Get out there early, or late

During the Summertime, it might be wise to avoid your lunchtime workout and opt for a more cooler time of day. Not only will it save you the heat, your body won’t feel as much of the exhaustion from the scorching temperatures. According to Active.com, unless you are training for an event that takes place in the daytime heat, you should avoid exercising from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m because it’s the hottest part of the day. Generally, the early morning is the best time to workout, especially if it’s going to be scorcher that day.

young-fit-woman-on-morning-jogging-run-picjumbo-com

  1. Wear loose, light-colored gear

The lighter colors will help reflect heat and while performance fabrics are the best option (since they are designed to keep you cool), cotton materials also help the evaporation of sweat.

tees

  1. Try something different

Biking, running, and tennis are fantastic exercises any time of the year, but they can all prove extremely challenging during the heat of Summer. If it’s just too hot for your go-to activity, try something different. Swimming is an incredible workout and if you live on the coast, why not take a stab a surfing? You’ll still be able to enjoy the outdoors, but the exercise will be more manageable from the cool water.

  1. Head indoors

Active.com says that runners should be particularly wary of hot weather if they live in an area with a lot of pollution. So, hitting the treadmill or elliptical in the gym is probably a safer bet.

If you insist on putting in some time outdoors, consider adapting your workout. Kenny Boyd, athletic trainer for the football team at the University of Texas, told U.S. News and World Report to try just the core part of your workout outside. You can use the gym for your warm up and cool down.

gyms cardio

  1. Listen to your body

The most important thing is to listen to your body. If you’re out in the heat and begin feeling dizzy, faint or nauseous, stop immediately. Overall, just be smart about your expectations. No need to try to set a new record in 100-degree weather.

Fit-3

How to Boost Your Metabolism at Any Age

By Maire,

A Faster Metabolism at Any Age

The secret? Eating more often, sleeping longer, and spending less time working out (really!).

You’d like to do something—anything—to speed up your metabolism, but it’s out of your control. Right? Not quite. Although genetics and your age both play a role, recent studies suggest you have plenty of say over how well your metabolism—which involves your body’s ability to break down food into usable energy—functions.

In fact, you can all but negate the metabolic slowdown that happens after 40 by tweaking your diet, exercise, and sleep habits. “Think of your body as an engine—your metabolism is the rate at which your engine runs,” explains Scott Isaacs, MD, an endocrinologist in Atlanta and author of Hormonal Balance: How to Lose Weight By Understanding Your Hormones and Metabolism. “By making adjustments to these three elements, you can actually make your engine rev higher.”

The eating and exercise plans on these pages were designed to keep your metabolism humming to the tune of up to 10 pounds off in 21 days. Read on for the keys to not only losing, but losing for good.
Key 1: Eat early
Your basal metabolic rate—the number of calories your body burns at rest—is based on things like age, height, and body type, so there isn’t much you can do to alter it. But there is a lot you can do to change the number of calories you burn above that, beginning with your diet. Specifically: Eat breakfast.

We already know the reasons you may not want to (you don’t have the time/energy/stomach for it), but leaving for work on an empty stomach is like hitting the pause button on your metabolism. Here’s why: When your brain senses your stomach is empty, it sends a message to your cells to conserve energy in case another meal doesn’t arrive. In other words, your body holds onto the fat stored in your cells instead of helping you burn it off.

“Breakfast triggers a process called thermogenesis, where the body signals the brain to activate the metabolic process of turning food into energy,” says Mark Hyman, MD, author ofThe Blood Sugar Solution.
Key 2: Eat often
To keep your metabolism humming, Dr. Hyman suggests eating small meals every three or four hours. Aim to make each of those meals at least one-quarter protein—whether it’s animal protein, beans, or dairy, says Marissa Lippert, RD, who designed the eating plan on page 39. A recent study in the journal Neuron suggests that consuming protein stimulates the cells responsible for switching on the body’s calorie-burning mechanism.

Foods high in sugar and processed carbs, on the other hand, can lead to another problem: insulin resistance. “As we get older, it’s crucial to pay attention to how much sugar we’re consuming,” says Diane Kress, RD, author of The Metabolism Miracle. “Too much messes with your metabolism by causing your body to store extra calories as fat.”

 

Key 3: Sweat off the weight
Even more important? Exercise. “Not only does it affect your metabolism while you’re doing it, but research shows you can keep burning calories up to 24 hours after you finish because your metabolism stays elevated,” Dr. Isaacs says.

That’s especially true if you challenge yourself: A new study in the journal Cell Metabolismsuggests that intense bouts of exercise can “turn on” genes responsible for energy metabolism. Researchers found that the activation of these fat- burning genes was higher in cyclists who pedaled at 80 percent of their aerobic capacity versus those who did a more moderate cycling session at 40 percent. So although you can’t permanently change your DNA (if only!), experts say exercise can fire up certain genes that initiate the fat-burning process.

Exercise is particularly helpful once you pass the age of 40, when your metabolism naturally begins to slow down. Experts used to believe it slowed due to an inevitable loss of muscle mass. However, a study in the journal The Physician and Sports Medicine found that fit women ages 41 to 81 who continued to exercise four to five times a week as they got older had little change in body composition. The real reason you lose muscle with age? You stop using it. “We now know that women who keep up a regular vigorous fitness routine don’t experience the metabolic decrease,” Dr. Isaacs says.

gyms cardio

Key 4: Sleep away the pounds
No, it’s not your imagination. Too little sleep can cause you to gain—and not just because you’re spending those extra waking hours in front of the TV nursing a bag of chips. Research suggests that people who sleep two-thirds of their usual amount (five hours instead of eight, say) eat an average of 549 extra calories the following day without realizing it. Experts believe this is because too few zzz’s upset the balance of important appetite-regulating hormones.

But that’s not all: A Swedish study found that even one night of disrupted sleep can cause the body to burn up to 20 percent fewer calories the following day. “Sleep deprivation impacts multiple hormones related to metabolism,” Dr. Isaacs says. “Resistance to leptin—a hormone that regulates body weight—increases, while levels of ghrelin, a hormone that signals to your brain that you’re hungry, also increase.”

Aim for seven to eight hours of pillow time a night, advises Dr. Hyman. “Just a small change in your sleep schedule can make a big difference in your health.” Not to mention your ability to burn calories.

 

(Article Source: Health.com)

Pump Up The Jam – Positive Effects of Music on Exercise

By Maire,

The secret to scoring your best body ever is hiding in something you already carry around all day: your phone. “Workout music can increase endurance by at least 15 percent,” says Jacque Crockford, Exercise Physiologist/Education Specialist at ACE. With the Fit Radio app, you can enjoy hundreds of mixes from a variety of genres and stations curated specifically for you by professional DJs. Our motto has always been the same: Why spend time making playlists yourself when you can spend time sweating? Here are the top five reasons a killer curated workout playlist can change your workout forever:

1. Workout Music Helps You Keep Your Pace

For maximum benefit, your desired speed/heart rate should match up with each song’s beats per minute, or BPM. According to the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. “Synchronized music tends to drive exercise intensity.” Using your Fit Radio app, you have the ability to choose your workout music based on your desired BPM, or even your type of workout, and Fit Radio will deliver fresh new mixes that match your desired heart rate. Plus, through the new Running tab, Fit Radio will automatically detect your pace when you start running. From there, Fit Radio will take care of the rest and deliver the perfect running playlist that matches each footfall of your stride.

Music for your workout

2. Workout Music Increases Your Endurance

Remember those times you spent hours on the dance floor or jamming out all night at your favorite concert? You didn’t even notice because you got lost in the music! Music is proven to increase endurance because it serves as a (positive) distraction. When you turn on your Fit Radio app, our professionally engineered mixes are designed to not only keep you moving and motivated through your entire workout, but also having fun and getting lost in the beats. Your best workout always happens when it doesn’t seem like a workout.

Listening to Fit Radio

 

3. Workout Music Keeps You Focused

Everyone has that go-to song that always pumps them up no matter what. Believe it or not, there’s science as to why that happens. When you can associate songs with certain memories or tap into the emotions of the lyrics, it boosts the motivational power of a song. Each mix that is added to Fit Radio has been specially created by our professional Fit Radio DJs keeping the listeners in mind — thinking about what will help keep them motivated, excited, and wanting more.

Running with Music

4. Music Can Elevate Your Mood

To music lovers, this comes as no surprise, but scientists have recently found that people can boost their mood by simply listening to upbeat music. Not to mention, recent studies have also found that randomness in music increases dopamine levels in your brain. Not only does the Fit Radio app house hundred of mixes from the genres and artists that you love, they’re engineered re-mixes designed to give you non-stop music while also surprising you at every turn so you never know what’s next. (Talk about a win-win!)

Enjoying Workout Music

5. Music Makes You Move

Researchers found that when music possesses “high-groove” qualities, the brain gets excited and induces movement in the listener. With your Fit Radio app, turn on any mix and it has the ability to make you move — no matter how much you’re dreading your workout.

zumba

 

We're Putting the "Crack" Back in Your BlackBerry

By superadmin,

CrackBerry, FIT Radio is bringing CrackBerry back

Yes you read that right, to all of you who thought BlackBerry was a thing of the past, shame on you for falling for their incredible hustling ways. In the words of LL Cool J, “Don’t call it a comeback, I been here for years.” FIT Radio has released a new build for the BlackBerry and it’s pretty freakin’ awesome. If you haven’t checked out the latest touch screen from the BBM masters, your fingers are missing out. The design for the app is somewhat similar to the Android, but the user interface is obviously congruent with how the BlackBerry is designed. This isn’t your dad’s phone anymore, spread the word: FIT Radio is on BlackBerry and we’ve got thousands of reasons (aka bomb a$$ mixes) why you should get back to your ol’ CrackBerry ways, but this time get addicted to fitness and music rather than breaking that silly roller ball playing Brick Breaker.

 

Optimal Music for the Gym

By superadmin,

Researchers Say The Right Tempo Boosts Stamina, Energy Efficiency

Looking for a perfect tune for your workout?

Michael Jackson’s “Beat It” has the optimal beat. So does “Gangnam Style” by Psy and Lady Gaga’s “Edge of Glory.”

Research has found that at the right tempo, music can reduce the sense of exertion as well as boost motivation. Costas Karageorghis, deputy head of research at the School of Sport and Education at London’s Brunel University, says the “sweet spot” for workout music is between 125 and 140 beats per minute when people aren’t trying to time their movements to the music. Previously, experts believed that the faster a person exercises, the faster the music tempo should be.

Other new studies have shown that when athletes synchronize their movements to a musical beat, their bodies can handle more exertion: Treadmill walkers had greater stamina and cyclists required less oxygen uptake. And swimmers who listened to music during races finished faster than others who didn’t

“Music can alter emotional and physiological arousal much like a pharmacological stimulant or sedative,” says Dr. Karageorghis, who has worked as a consultant psychologist to music and sports-equipment companies and for Olympic athletes. “It has the capacity to stimulate people even before they go into the gym.”

The benefits of music seem most pronounced during low-to-moderate-intensity exercise—in other words, it’s more effective for recreational exercisers than elite athletes, scientists say. And finding just the right beat isn’t difficult, as a lot of popular music falls within the optimum tempo range and most other musical genres also have music in that range, Dr. Karageorghis says. For classical music buffs, two pieces that work for him are Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, known as the “Eroica” symphony, and Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 in G minor. Other qualities that make music ideal for workouts are motivational sounds and lyrics—think the theme from “Chariots of Fire” with its associated image of men running on the beach.

Sylwia Wiesenberg, owner of Tonique Fitness in New York City, says she keeps tempo in mind when compiling playlists for her two-hour cardio and body-sculpting class. “The hardest part of the class is the first 15 to 20 minutes,” she says. “I use music as my powerful instrument to push people harder,” she says. More